The debate so far has been largely repetitive of past positions. Democrats such as Rockefeller, Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Crying on TV doesn't qualify Kimmel to set nation's gun agenda Trump knocks ‘fake’ news coverage of his trip to Puerto Rico MORE (N.Y.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowDems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Red-state Dems need more from Trump before tax embrace Stabenow: ‘Kid Rock might actually win the Republican primary’ MORE (Mich.) warned that repealing the law would raise the deficit and limit healthcare options. Republicans such as John CornynJohn CornynGun proposal picks up GOP support House bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Republicans jockey for position on immigration MORE (R-Texas) took to the floor to say repeal is needed to limit government overreach and respect the demands of voters.

There is a possibility of a fight tomorrow over how to repeal the 1099 reporting requirements in last year's healthcare law. Sen. Mike JohannsMike JohannsFarmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington MORE (R-Neb.) has introduced his own 1099 repeal language that would ask the Office of Management and Budget to rescind $39 billion in discretionary funds in order to make up for the cost of the proposal, an idea that most Democrats rejected.

The Democratic alternative was a bill from Sen. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (D-Mont.) to repeal the 1099 language without paying for it, but this too was rejected. Stabenow put forward her own amendment to repeal the 1099 requirement, but it has not yet been released.