The debate so far has been largely repetitive of past positions. Democrats such as Rockefeller, Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCan Mueller be more honest than his colleagues? Throwing some cold water on all of the Korean summit optimism House Republicans push Mulvaney, Trump to rescind Gateway funds MORE (N.Y.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowVulnerable Senate Dems have big cash advantages Senators push HHS to negotiate lower prices on opioid overdose reversal drug Senators press administration on mental health parity MORE (Mich.) warned that repealing the law would raise the deficit and limit healthcare options. Republicans such as John CornynJohn CornynRand's reversal advances Pompeo Joe Scarborough predicts Trump won't run in 2020 Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller MORE (R-Texas) took to the floor to say repeal is needed to limit government overreach and respect the demands of voters.

There is a possibility of a fight tomorrow over how to repeal the 1099 reporting requirements in last year's healthcare law. Sen. Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.) has introduced his own 1099 repeal language that would ask the Office of Management and Budget to rescind $39 billion in discretionary funds in order to make up for the cost of the proposal, an idea that most Democrats rejected.

The Democratic alternative was a bill from Sen. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusGreen Party puts Dem seat at risk in Montana Business groups worried about Trump's China tariffs plan Farmers hit Trump on trade in new ad MORE (D-Mont.) to repeal the 1099 language without paying for it, but this too was rejected. Stabenow put forward her own amendment to repeal the 1099 requirement, but it has not yet been released.