The debate so far has been largely repetitive of past positions. Democrats such as Rockefeller, Charles SchumerCharles SchumerThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote Schumer jams to Diana Ross at New York party Warren cautions Dems against infighting MORE (N.Y.) and Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowNo certainty on cost-sharing payments to insurers Dems express concerns about Trump's proposed rural development cuts Trump, Clinton campaign aides launch their own bids MORE (Mich.) warned that repealing the law would raise the deficit and limit healthcare options. Republicans such as John CornynJohn CornynThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote Week ahead: Senate races toward healthcare vote Cornyn: Passing Senate healthcare bill by July 4 ‘optimistic’ MORE (R-Texas) took to the floor to say repeal is needed to limit government overreach and respect the demands of voters.

There is a possibility of a fight tomorrow over how to repeal the 1099 reporting requirements in last year's healthcare law. Sen. Mike JohannsMike JohannsLobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops MORE (R-Neb.) has introduced his own 1099 repeal language that would ask the Office of Management and Budget to rescind $39 billion in discretionary funds in order to make up for the cost of the proposal, an idea that most Democrats rejected.

The Democratic alternative was a bill from Sen. Max BaucusMax BaucusLawmakers: Leave advertising tax break alone GOP: FBI firing won't slow agenda White House tax-reform push is ‘game changer,’ says ex-chairman MORE (D-Mont.) to repeal the 1099 language without paying for it, but this too was rejected. Stabenow put forward her own amendment to repeal the 1099 requirement, but it has not yet been released.