Rockefeller is expected to continue to allow amendments to be submitted this week and possibly into next week before finalizing an agreement with Republicans on which amendments will come up for a vote.

Democrats allowed two healthcare amendments to the FAA bill yesterday; one to repeal the healthcare law was rejected, but one to end an IRS tax reporting requirement was accepted. Still, the Senate may still have to decide whether to consider other healthcare amendments to the FAA bill.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonGingrich says arming teachers only long-term solution to school shootings Florida students turn to activism in wake of shooting CNN invites Trump to town hall with parents, students of Florida high school MORE (D-Fla.) has proposed an amendment to the FAA bill that is a sense of Congress asking the Supreme Court to decide on whether the healthcare law is constitutional. Yesterday, Nelson said a prompt Supreme Court decision would help prevent Congress from continuing to fight about the law.

Also related to healthcare, Sens. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves Dem senator shares photo praising LeBron James after Laura Ingraham attacks Trump gets recommendation for steep curbs on imported steel, risking trade war MORE (D-Ohio) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann Stabenow10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country At least Alzheimer’s research is bringing Washington together Senate Dems block crackdown on sanctuary cities MORE (D-Mich.) are proposing an amendment that would extend a health insurance tax credit under the Trade Adjustment Assistance program.

Other amendment proposals have nothing to do with either the FAA or healthcare. One from Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterTrump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge Where is due process in all the sexual harassment allegations? Not the Senate's job to second-guess Alabama voters MORE (R-La.) would require the U.S. government to prioritize old age, survivors' and disability pay through the Social Security Administration in the event that the government reaches its debt limit later this year. This is similar to an amendment from Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) that would ensure that government payments on interest on U.S. debt takes priority in the event that the U.S. reaches its debt limit.

Each of these amendments indicate that a decision to extend the U.S. debt limit may be difficult to reach, as several Republicans are arguing that the U.S. should cut government spending rather than raise the debt ceiling.

Several pending amendments are FAA-related and could be taken up next week. One from Sens. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) and Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (D-N.Y.) would require criminal penalties to be applied to anyone who makes an unauthorized recording of security screening images or distributes those images. This is an apparent reaction to some passenger complaints that security images have been distributed.

Another from Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranFlake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (R-Kan.) would require the secretary of Defense to report on any unfair competitive advantage that might have existed in the context of contract awards for the KC-X aerial refueling program. One amendment from Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) would expand direct flight service to Reagan National Airport.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Defense: First Gitmo transfer under Trump could happen 'soon' | White House says Trump has confidence in VA chief | Russia concedes 'dozens' of civilians injured in Syria clash Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived House passes deal to end shutdown MORE (R-Okla.) has proposed an amendment that would limit the legal liability of volunteer pilots, such as those that fly for humanitarian or emergency purposes. One from Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerAt least Alzheimer’s research is bringing Washington together McConnell urging Mississippi gov to appoint himself if Cochran resigns: report Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (R-Miss.), who spoke on the floor today about his amendment, would deny Transportation Security Administration employees collective bargaining rights.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (R-Ariz.) would real the essential air service program, which subsidizes air service in smaller communities and costs about $200 million per year.