The Senate on Tuesday voted 86-12 Tuesday to extend the Patriot Act for three months. 

The vote came one day after the House passed legislation extending the Patriot Act until Dec. 2011.

Due to an amendment tacked on to the House bill by Senate leaders Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWATCH: There is no Trump-Russia collusion and the media should stop pushing this The demise of debate in Congress ‘North by Northwest,’ the Carter Page remake MORE (D-Nev.) and Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers feel pressure on guns Bipartisan group of House lawmakers urge action on Export-Import Bank nominees Curbelo Dem rival lashes out over immigration failure MORE (R-Ky.) earlier Tuesday the Senate version of the bill only extends the Patriot Act until May 27, 2011.

The bill is H.R. 514, which would let the government access business records, conduct roving wiretaps, and monitor individual terrorists until Dec. 8 of this year. 

Prior to the vote, members of the Senate Intelligence Committee took to the floor to argue that the legislation remains  essential for national security. 

Chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.), for example, quoted Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano in arguing that that threat level against the nation is at its "most heightened state in more than 10 years."

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinAmerica’s waning commitment to the promise of the First Amendment Senate rejects Trump immigration plan What to watch for in the Senate immigration votes MORE (D-Ill.) said that while he sees some problems with the Patriot Act, the three month extension will afford the Senate time for further deliberation.

"I will support this extension because it gives the Senate time to properly consider this critically important legislation," Durbin said.

But Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem wins Kentucky state House seat in district Trump won by 49 points GOP's tax reform bait-and-switch will widen inequality Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived MORE (R-Ky.) argued that the bill could represent a violation of Americans' constitutional rights. 

"I will vote against it because I don't think its doing full justice to the Fourth Amendment," Paul said.

The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution guards against unreasonable searches and seizures on private citizens.

The current version of the Patriot Act will expire on March 4.

This story was updated at 6:57 p.m.