The Senate on Tuesday voted 86-12 Tuesday to extend the Patriot Act for three months. 

The vote came one day after the House passed legislation extending the Patriot Act until Dec. 2011.

Due to an amendment tacked on to the House bill by Senate leaders Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) and Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat McConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Brent Budowsky: A plea to Alabama voters MORE (R-Ky.) earlier Tuesday the Senate version of the bill only extends the Patriot Act until May 27, 2011.

The bill is H.R. 514, which would let the government access business records, conduct roving wiretaps, and monitor individual terrorists until Dec. 8 of this year. 

Prior to the vote, members of the Senate Intelligence Committee took to the floor to argue that the legislation remains  essential for national security. 

Chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.), for example, quoted Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano in arguing that that threat level against the nation is at its "most heightened state in more than 10 years."

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats turn on Al Franken Minnesota's largest newspaper calls on Franken to resign Democratic senator predicts Franken will resign Thursday MORE (D-Ill.) said that while he sees some problems with the Patriot Act, the three month extension will afford the Senate time for further deliberation.

"I will support this extension because it gives the Senate time to properly consider this critically important legislation," Durbin said.

But Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.) argued that the bill could represent a violation of Americans' constitutional rights. 

"I will vote against it because I don't think its doing full justice to the Fourth Amendment," Paul said.

The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution guards against unreasonable searches and seizures on private citizens.

The current version of the Patriot Act will expire on March 4.

This story was updated at 6:57 p.m.