House leadership late Friday unveiled a two-week CR that would cut about $4 billion in spending on items that many Democrats have already agreed should be eliminated. To make the savings, the spending plan would rescind earmarks and cut programs President Obama also eliminated in his 2012 budget proposal.

House Republicans operate under a rule that demands 72 hours of open viewership for any piece of legislation before it can be voted on. Under that rule the House could hold a vote on the stopgap measure as early as Monday night.

The question of how that bill fares in the Senate depends partially on where House Republicans make the cuts.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE's (D-Nev.) spokesman on Friday released a statement with a positive reaction to the expected House Republican stopgap measure, but that was before the details had been unveiled.

If Republicans keep the cuts mostly to earmarks and other expenditures opposed by conservative Democrats, senators such as John Tester (D-Mont.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocrats turn on Al Franken Trump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Mo.) and others may be inclined to support it, further strengthening the GOP’s hand.