The Senate on Thursday approved legislation to fund the government for three more weeks, sending the measure to the White House. 

The 87-13 vote gives President Obama, and congressional Republicans and Democrats, another short window to reach a deal on a measure to fund the government for the rest of the year.

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The outcome in the Senate was similar to a vote earlier this month that funded the government for two weeks. 

Only four more senators voted against the measure on Thursday compared to the earlier vote on March 1, when nine senators voted no. 

Nine Republicans, three Democrats and Independent Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight MORE (Vt.) voted against the measure on Thursday.

The GOP "no" votes came from Sens. John Ensign (Nev.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeA third of Congress hasn’t held a town hall — it’s time to take action Anonymous affiliate publishes claimed list of GOP private contact info Wasting America’s nuclear opportunity MORE (Okla.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Lawmakers grapple with warrantless wiretapping program MORE (Ky.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Trump bets base will stick with him on immigration MORE (Fla.), Jim DeMint (S.C.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchFinance to hold hearing on ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea Week ahead in finance: Clock ticking for GOP on tax reform MORE (Utah), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischSenate approves Trump's debt deal with Democrats Overnight Cybersecurity: Mueller impanels grand jury in Russia probe | Researcher who helped stop WannaCry attack detained | Audit finds OPM systems still at risk Overnight Finance: Trump signs Russia sanctions bill, rips Congress | Trump plan would cut legal immigration | Senate confirms labor board pick | House Budget chair running for governor | Regulator takes step to change 'Volcker Rule' MORE (Idaho), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate Banking panel approves Trump's Fed, comptroller nominees Harvey damage adds urgency to flood insurance debate Don't let funding for US Forest Service go up in flames MORE (Idaho) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (Utah). Ensign, Inhofe, Rubio and DeMint voted in favor of the earlier bill.

Sens. Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE (W.Va.), Carl LevinCarl LevinPresident Trump, listen to candidate Trump and keep Volcker Rule Republicans can learn from John McCain’s heroism Trump and GOP wise to keep tax reform and infrastructure separate MORE (Mich.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayWeek ahead: Senators near deal to stabilize ObamaCare markets Policymaking commission offers a glimmer of hope in hyper-partisan Washington Dems call on DeVos to work with CFPB to protect student borrowers MORE (Wash.) were the Democratic "no" votes. 

While more senators voted against the short-term measure, the swing against the bill was not as dramatic as in the House, where 54 Republicans voted against their leaders on Tuesday despite a whipping effort. Only six House Republicans had voted against an earlier short-term measure. More Democrats in the House also voted no this week.

Republicans opposing the short-term measure have complained it does not include language blocking funding for the new healthcare law and Planned Parenthood. That language was included in a measure funding the government for the rest of the year that was approved by the House.

Republicans have also argued that it is time to move a bill funding the government for the full year.

The new measure will keep the government funded through April 8. If the two sides do not reach a deal by then, the government would shut down.

Republican senators supporting the resolution on Thursday said it would keep the GOP on a path to meet its target for reducing spending this year.

“I think it [the stopgap] keeps us on track to achieve $61 billion in cuts to federal spending for the remainder for this year,” Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) said in floor comments.

Some Democrats, however, voted against the measure and said it went too far in cutting needed programs. Rockefeller, for example, said the cuts simply went too far in reducing healthcare and other programs. 

The bill would reduce spending this year by $6 billion. Both the Obama administration and Senate Democrats supported many of the cuts.

The measure approved Thursday includes $2.1 billion in rescissions of funds that have not been used; $2.5 billion in earmark terminations and  $1.1 billion to financial services/general government programs.

This includes $276 million for a fund to fight flu pandemics; $225 million in funding for community service employment for older Americans; and $200 million in funding for Internet and technology projects.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the three-week stopgap gives Congress “time to find common ground” on a deal to fund government for the remainder of the fiscal year.

“We all agree we want to cut spending, which is why we have already met Republicans halfway,” he said in a statement. But he said the president would continue to oppose "harmful cuts," including in the areas of education and research and development, as well as "additions to the bill that have nothing to do with fiscal policy."

The House and Senate are set to adjourn on Thursday or Friday for a weeklong recess.

This post was updated at 4:05 p.m.