According to the Senate rules, legislation must percolate for 30 hours before it sees a first vote — unless a unanimous consent agreement can be reached to wave that time frame. Reid tried to get such consent on Thursday, but Sen. Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonRight renews push for term limits as Trump takes power Overnight Tech: Tech listens for clues at Sessions hearing | EU weighs expanding privacy rule | Senators blast Backpage execs Senate poised to confirm Trump's DHS pick after friendly hearing MORE (R-Wis.) objected, which started the clock.  

Despite the length of Friday's session, it counts as a full day of work.

Senate leaders will attempt to bring the Libya resolution to the floor by means of a cloture vote at 5 p.m. Tuesday. It will need 60 votes in order to advance.