According to the Senate rules, legislation must percolate for 30 hours before it sees a first vote — unless a unanimous consent agreement can be reached to wave that time frame. Reid tried to get such consent on Thursday, but Sen. Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonThe Hill's 12:30 Report Passing US-Canada preclearance would improve security and economy Overnight Finance: Trump expected to pick Steven Mnuchin for Treasury | Budget chair up for grabs | Trump team gets deal on Carrier jobs MORE (R-Wis.) objected, which started the clock.  

Despite the length of Friday's session, it counts as a full day of work.

Senate leaders will attempt to bring the Libya resolution to the floor by means of a cloture vote at 5 p.m. Tuesday. It will need 60 votes in order to advance.