In winning a procedural motion, the Senate overcame opposition led by Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: Why does Scott Pruitt still have a job? DOJ announces M grant to cover costs associated with Parkland shooting ‘Morning Joe’ host: Trump tweeting during Barbara Bush funeral ‘insulting’ to US MORE (R-Ala.), the ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. He argued that it was improper for the Senate to take up appropriations work without first passing a budget. 

Republican Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerRand's reversal advances Pompeo Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit Pompeo headed for confirmation after surprise panel vote MORE (Tenn.), Jim DeMint (S.C.), John CornynJohn CornynRand's reversal advances Pompeo Joe Scarborough predicts Trump won't run in 2020 Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller MORE (Texas), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Juan Williams: GOP support for Trump begins to crack This week: Senate barrels toward showdown over Pompeo MORE (Iowa), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator: Congress needs ‘to move on’ from Russia probe GOP senator: ‘Way too early’ to talk about supporting Trump in 2020 IG report faults fired FBI official McCabe for leak to media MORE (Wis.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Trump’s pick to lead NASA Key senators warn Trump of North Korea effort on Syria Rep. Jordan: Action in Syria ‘should be debated in Congress’ MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand's reversal advances Pompeo Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit After Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp MORE (Ky.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFormer Florida congressmen mull bipartisan gubernatorial run: report Winners and losers from Jim Bridenstine’s confirmation as NASA administrator GOP Senate candidates trade barbs in brutal Indiana primary MORE (Fla.), Pat Toomey (Pa.) and David VitterDavid Bruce VitterPlanned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge Where is due process in all the sexual harassment allegations? MORE (La.) followed Sessions in trying to derail the measure. 

In June, the House approved the same legislation in a 411-5 vote. 

In filing cloture on the bill last week, Reid cited a "good conversation" he had had with his GOP counterpart, Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRand's reversal advances Pompeo After Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp Overnight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care MORE (R-Ky.), and said he enjoyed the support of the leaders of the Senate Appropriations Committee as well.

“Hopefully we can show the country that we can work though an appropriations bill without getting bogged down,” Reid said, referencing the difficulties the Senate has had in moving any legislation this year.

Sessions took to the floor to announce that he would force a symbolic vote to object to the fact that the Senate is proceeding to a 2012 appropriations bill without ever having adopted a budget. 

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) has developed a budget resolution that can pass his committee but has not tried to move it. It contains $2 trillion in revenue increases that give some Democrats heartburn. The top-line spending number in the end will be decided by White House-led negotiations over the deficit. 

Sessions said he would use a point of order called for in the budget act that would force 50 senators to agree to proceed to an appropriations bill in the absence of an budget.

The Military Construction bill is in itself relatively noncontroversial. The Senate Appropriations and House Appropriations bills differ little in their substance.

The White House on Wednesday outlined some objections to the bill. 

It says that one provision in the bill could be construed to mean the president must notify Congress 30 days in advance of military exercises. The White House says this provision appears to violate the Constitution's granting of commander-in-chief powers to the executive branch.

The White House also said that it is worried about cuts to basing expenses in Bahrain and Guam because it could send a signal to Japan that the U.S. is not going to make good on a commitment to remove U.S. troops from a controversial base at Okinawa. 

The bill spends $72 billion in discretionary funds, a cut of $618 million below current levels and $1.25 billion below President Obama’s budget request.

The Senate bill contains $58.6 billion for VA discretionary funding, an increase of $2.3 billion.