"This is a common-sense amendment that will secure disability payments for veterans and make sure we are not paying for disabilities that are not truly service-related," said Coburn. 

Sen. Patty MurrayPatty MurrayWeek ahead: Senate panel to vote on Trump's FDA pick Overnight Healthcare: GOP healthcare talks stall | Ryan takes backset to Pence in new repeal effort | FDA nominee grilled over industry ties Senators battle over FDA nominee's financial ties MORE (D-Wash.) countered that injuries caused by herbicides like Agent Orange were too difficult to track among former members of the military in order to justify such stringent standards.

“Our military did a miserable job of tracking these exposures," said Murray. "No veteran is going to be able to tell you when or much of this poison, Agent Orange, they inhaled.”

The Senate voted 69 to 30 to table Coburn’s amendment. 

An amendment offered by Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteBottom Line How Gorsuch's confirmation shapes the next Supreme Court battle THE MEMO: Trump set to notch needed win with Gorsuch MORE (R-N.H.) to ensure that “wounded warriors” get the benefits of next-generation advanced prosthetics in a timely fashion and an amendment offered by Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerAnother day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs Carly Fiorina 'certainly looking at' Virginia Senate run Top Obama adviser signs with Hollywood talent agency: report MORE (D-Calif.) to order a study on the infrastructure of Department of Defense schools were both agreed to by unanimous consent.   

Republican Sens. Tom CoburnTom CoburnFreedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC Coburn: Trump's tweets aren't presidential MORE (Okla.) and Bob CorkerBob CorkerGroups warn of rural health 'crisis' under ObamaCare repeal Ringing the alarm in Congress: 20 million lives at risk due to famine Senators want more efficient way to get food aid to Africa MORE (Tenn.) both voted against the underlying legislation. 

The Senate is expected to now move to the House GOP's legislation to cut and cap federal spending while adding a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution.