Murray added that the media should not expect members of the supercommittee to take on certain roles based on reputation.

“The pundits and journalists should not pigeonhole any one of us,” she said. “That will allow us to move forward.”

As a leader of the committee, Murray said she has been in touch with the other 11 members and was impressed with the gravity with which they take their responsibility. 

“I have reached out individually to each member of the committee,” Murray told The Columbian. “I’ve been impressed that they consider this a serious responsibility.”

The debt-ceiling deal signed into law earlier in the month establishes the bipartisan, bicameral supercommittee of 12 legislators, for which Murray was chosen by Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE (D-Nev.) to serve as the Democratic leader.

The committee is charged with putting together a $1.5 trillion deficit-reduction package.

The other five senators chosen to serve on the supercommittee are: Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), John KerryJohn Forbes KerryFor the sake of national security, Trump must honor the Iran deal Bernie Sanders’s 1960s worldview makes bad foreign policy DiCaprio: History will ‘vilify’ Trump for not fighting climate change MORE (D-Mass.), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (D-Mont.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOvernight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Reddit hires first lobbyists Senate panel approves bill compelling researchers to ‘hack’ DHS MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.).

The overall debt-limit agreement cuts federal deficits by nearly $1 trillion over 10 years while raising the debt ceiling by at least $2.1 trillion through 2012.