Murray added that the media should not expect members of the supercommittee to take on certain roles based on reputation.

“The pundits and journalists should not pigeonhole any one of us,” she said. “That will allow us to move forward.”

As a leader of the committee, Murray said she has been in touch with the other 11 members and was impressed with the gravity with which they take their responsibility. 

“I have reached out individually to each member of the committee,” Murray told The Columbian. “I’ve been impressed that they consider this a serious responsibility.”

The debt-ceiling deal signed into law earlier in the month establishes the bipartisan, bicameral supercommittee of 12 legislators, for which Murray was chosen by Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.) to serve as the Democratic leader.

The committee is charged with putting together a $1.5 trillion deficit-reduction package.

The other five senators chosen to serve on the supercommittee are: Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), John KerryJohn Forbes KerryFeehery: Oprah Dem presidential bid unlikely Dem hopefuls flock to Iowa Change in Iran will only come from its people — not the United States MORE (D-Mass.), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusSteady American leadership is key to success with China and Korea Orrin Hatch, ‘a tough old bird,’ got a lot done in the Senate Canada crossing fine line between fair and unfair trade MORE (D-Mont.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanFlake's anti-Trump speech will make a lot of noise, but not much sense Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race Overnight Tech: Regulators to look at trading in bitcoin futures | Computer chip flaws present new security problem | Zuckerberg vows to improve Facebook in 2018 MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.).

The overall debt-limit agreement cuts federal deficits by nearly $1 trillion over 10 years while raising the debt ceiling by at least $2.1 trillion through 2012.