The Senate named conferees for the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) Monday evening.

If the House approves the conference request, Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerAnother day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs Carly Fiorina 'certainly looking at' Virginia Senate run Top Obama adviser signs with Hollywood talent agency: report MORE (D-Calif.), Max BaucusMax BaucusChanging of the guard at DC’s top lobby firm GOP hasn’t reached out to centrist Dem senators Five reasons why Tillerson is likely to get through MORE (D-Mont.), Tom CarperTom CarperDems blast Trump's policies at Climate March What to know about Trump's national monuments executive order Dems probe claims of religious bias in DHS 'trusted traveler' program MORE (D-Del.), Ben CardinBen CardinDemocrats exploring lawsuit against Trump Overnight Finance: Dems explore lawsuit against Trump | Full-court press for Trump tax plan | Clock ticks down to spending deadline Sanders on skipping WH Korea briefing: 'I did not want to be part of a photo op' MORE (D-Md.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseHollywood, DC come together for First Amendment-themed VIP party Overnight Energy: Trump set to sign offshore drilling order Trump's FDA nominee clears key Senate committee MORE (D-R.I.), David VitterDavid VitterFormer senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry Former GOP rep joins K Street lobbying firm Capitol Counsel Lobbying World MORE (R-La.), James InhofeJames InhofeTaiwan deserves to participate in United Nations Optimism rising for infrastructure deal Repeal of Obama drilling rule stalls in the Senate MORE (R-Okla.), and John BarrassoJohn BarrassoTrump shouldn’t cater to a tech industry that hates him Poll: Sanders most popular senator in the US The animal advocate MORE (R-Wyo.) will iron out the differences between the House and Senate bill with House appointed counterparts.

ADVERTISEMENT
Both chambers passed their bills — which differed — on a bipartisan basis with little controversy.

Before adjourning for the evening the Senate also passed S.42, the Criminal Antitrust Anti-Retaliation Act, through a unanimous consent agreement.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahyHollywood, DC come together for First Amendment-themed VIP party The Hill's 12:30 Report Lawmakers talk climate for Earth Day, Science March MORE (D-Vt.) introduced S. 42, which would prohibit the firing or employment discrimination of any anti-trust whistleblower.