Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHow House Republicans scrambled the Russia probe Congress dangerously wields its oversight power in Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate MORE (D-Mich) said it was “critically important” that the Senate passes a defense authorization bill this week.

“It is critically important that this bill passes this week,” Levin said on the Senate floor Tuesday. “Otherwise there is very little hope that we could get a bill back from conference and passed in both houses in time.”

The Senate is considering the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which authorizes more than $625 billion in defense spending for the Pentagon.

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Time is running out to complete work on the “must-pass” legislation — Congress has passed an NDAA bill for 51 straight years.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) had said he wanted to complete work on the Defense bill before Thanksgiving even if that meant weekend sessions, but Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE’s (R-La.) insistence on getting an ObamaCare amendment is delaying Senate work.

Floor debate on the Defense authorization bill is typically a lengthy process, with hundreds of amendments offered and dozens receiving votes. If final passage gets pushed back until after the Senate’s Thanksgiving break, it gives a House and Senate conference committee little time to work out differences by the end of the year.

Some protections for victims of sexual assault were included during committee markup of NDAA, such as providing a lawyer for victims and criminalizing retaliation against victims who report assaults. 

The bill also gives an across the board 1 percent pay raise for services members and allows for the temporary transfer of Guantánamo Bay (Gitmo) detainees to the United States for trial or foreign countries.

But Reid said it was important to debate amendments on both military sexual assault and Gitmo detainees.