The sponsor of the GOP bill, Senate Finance Committee ranking member Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Utah governor calls Bannon a 'bigot' after attacks on Romney MORE (R-Utah), argued on Thursday that bill was a better alternative to the Democratic plan because it would not add to the deficit or raise taxes.

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"Built on several of the president's Jobs Council's proposals, this legislation is a better way of speeding transportation construction, while scrapping burdensome regulations that are hurting our nation’s job creators," Hatch said. "It isn't funded with job-killing tax hikes. It doesn't add a dime to the debt. And unlike the Democrats' stimulus proposal, it should garner bipartisan support."

Democrats opposed the legislation for a range of reasons. For example Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Raymond ReedSenate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Army leader on waiver report: 'There's been no change in standards' 15 Dems urge FEC to adopt new rules for online political ads MORE (D-R.I.) said it was two small and was paid for by taking money from other important spending priorities.

"It fails to provide the investments that deal with the infrastructure and jobs crisis we face today," said Reed. "It cuts $40 billion in discretionary funding without addressing the needs of our highway trust fund."

The bill also included a controversial provision that would have delayed several pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations, which drew fire from Democrats, like Sen. Barabara Boxer (D-Calif.)

Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) was the one Republican to break rank and vote against the measure. Likewise, Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Wealthy outsiders threaten to shake up GOP Senate primaries MORE (D-W.V.) was the one Democrat to break rank and vote for the plan allowing Republican leadership to claim their bill garnered bipartisan support.