The Senate will begin work next week on a bill that would repeal the $6 billion cut to military pensions.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis week: Congress awaits Comey testimony Will Republicans grow a spine and restore democracy? Racial representation: A solution to inequality in the People’s House MORE (D-Nev.) filed cloture on the motion to proceed to S. 1963, which was introduced by Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.). The first procedural vote will occur Monday evening.

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Pryor’s bill would repeal the $6 billion pension cut from the December 2013 budget deal that has come under harsh criticism, but the measure is not offset with a pay-for.

The Senate Armed Services Committee is prepared to mark up the legislation Monday, and Chairman Carl LevinCarl LevinDemocrats and Republicans share blame in rewriting the role of the Senate For the sake of American taxpayers, companies must pay their fair share What the Iran-Contra investigation can teach us about Russia probe MORE (D-Mich.) said he wants to have floor amendment votes on offset proposals.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Regulation: Biz groups push to scrap rule on reporting employee pay | GOP skeptical of Trump paid leave plan GOP skeptical of Trump plan for paid parental leave Sanders: Trump plan to cut Medicaid is 'just cruel' MORE (I-Vt.) has introduced an omnibus veterans bill that also addresses the issue, paying for the pension fix by using funds from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Republicans said that wasn’t a true pay-for, however.

Democrats have rejected a proposal from Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteWeek ahead: Comey firing dominates Washington GOP senators pitch Merrick Garland for FBI director Kelly Ayotte among candidates to be FBI director: report MORE (R-N.H.) that would reverse the pension cuts by preventing illegal immigrants from claiming a child tax credit. Democrats had other proposals as well that targeted offshore tax loopholes, but those were non-starters with Republicans.

In the budget deal, some veterans' cost-of-living retirement benefits were reduced by 1 percent. The omnibus spending bill corrected the fact that disabled veterans' benefits were also cut, but some lawmakers have argued no service member should see a reduction in cost-of-living increases.

If 60 senators vote to end debate on the motion to proceed, the Senate will likely spend the rest of the week debating that bill.