Senate Democrats spent more than 14 hours talking about the importance of climate change Monday night through Tuesday morning.

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Sens. Brian Schatz (Hawaii), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Defense: Officials make show of force on election security | Dems want probe into Air Force One tours | Pentagon believes Korean War remains 'consistent' with Americans Dems call for investigation of Trump Air Force One tours Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press MORE (R.I.) and Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerKamala Harris on 2020 presidential bid: ‘I’m not ruling it out’ The ‘bang for the buck’ theory fueling Trump’s infrastructure plan Kamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor MORE (Calif.) led the charge and more than 20 other Democrats participated, including members of leadership, in the Senate’s 35th all-night session.

“Climate change deniers still exist,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBattle of the billionaires drives Nevada contest Senate Democrats should stop playing politics on Kavanaugh Celebrities dive into midterms, hoping to thwart Trump MORE (D-Nev.) said at the beginning of the talkathon at 6:30 p.m. Monday. “They exist, I’m sorry to say, in this Congress. … Climate change exists and it’s time to stop denying it.”

Schatz and Whitehouse said Congress could reduce harmful effects of climate change if the United States relied less on fossil fuels.

“Climate change it real and climate change is caused by humans and climate change is solvable and we will not stop until Congress acts,” Schatz said.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHill.TV poll: Majority of Republicans say Trump best represents the values of the GOP The Hill's 12:30 Report Republican strategist: Trump is 'driven by ego' MORE (R-Ky.) said Democrats’ attack on fossil fuels was “cruel” to his constituents.

“Families are losing work because of government attacks on the coal industry. Communities are hurting and tonight you’re going to hear 30 hours of excuses from a group of people who think that’s OK,” McConnell said at the beginning of the evening. “Well it’s not OK. It’s cruel.”

McConnell has accused President Obama of waging a “war on coal” by ordering the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate carbon emissions at coal power plants.

The Kentucky Republican, who is facing a difficult reelection race, also blasted billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer, who plans to funnel a reported $10 million into crucial races that could make or break Democrats in their fight to retain the Senate majority.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofePence announces first steps in establishing 'Space Force' EPA chief: Obama car rule rollback would save consumers 0B EPA’s Wheeler gets warmer welcome at Senate hearing MORE (R-Okla.), who has authored a book claiming that climate change was the “biggest hoax” ever perpetrated on mankind, said Democrats didn’t have the votes to pass major legislation that could affect climate change, such as a carbon tax, which was why the administration was implementing more regulations.

“I know they’ll enjoy staying up all night and they’ll have an audience of themselves,” Inhofe said. “It’s been virtually impossible to pass a cap and trade bill.”

Whitehouse has said he wants to make climate change a major issue in the 2014 election.

Notably, vulnerable Democrats such as Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLobbying world Former New Orleans mayor: It's not my 'intention' to run for president Dems grasp for way to stop Trump's Supreme Court pick MORE (La.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska congressional candidate has never visited the state: AP Former Alaska senator jumps into governor race Overnight Energy: Trump directs Perry to stop coal plant closures | EPA spent ,560 on customized pens | EPA viewed postcard to Pruitt as a threat MORE (Alaska) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) didn’t participate in the all-nighter.

-- This report was updated at 9:54 a.m.