Senate Democrats spent more than 14 hours talking about the importance of climate change Monday night through Tuesday morning.

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Sens. Brian Schatz (Hawaii), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Live coverage: Trump's FBI nominee questioned by senators Committees vie to be first to question Trump Jr. MORE (R.I.) and Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTime is now to address infrastructure needs Tom Steyer testing waters for Calif. gubernatorial bid Another day, another dollar for retirement advice rip-offs MORE (Calif.) led the charge and more than 20 other Democrats participated, including members of leadership, in the Senate’s 35th all-night session.

“Climate change deniers still exist,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) said at the beginning of the talkathon at 6:30 p.m. Monday. “They exist, I’m sorry to say, in this Congress. … Climate change exists and it’s time to stop denying it.”

Schatz and Whitehouse said Congress could reduce harmful effects of climate change if the United States relied less on fossil fuels.

“Climate change it real and climate change is caused by humans and climate change is solvable and we will not stop until Congress acts,” Schatz said.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellSenate spending plan boosts House moderates Cruz: Tax reform chances ‘drop significantly’ if healthcare fails Parliamentarian deals setback to GOP repeal bill MORE (R-Ky.) said Democrats’ attack on fossil fuels was “cruel” to his constituents.

“Families are losing work because of government attacks on the coal industry. Communities are hurting and tonight you’re going to hear 30 hours of excuses from a group of people who think that’s OK,” McConnell said at the beginning of the evening. “Well it’s not OK. It’s cruel.”

McConnell has accused President Obama of waging a “war on coal” by ordering the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate carbon emissions at coal power plants.

The Kentucky Republican, who is facing a difficult reelection race, also blasted billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer, who plans to funnel a reported $10 million into crucial races that could make or break Democrats in their fight to retain the Senate majority.

Sen. James InhofeJames InhofeMcCain absence adds to GOP agenda’s uncertainty GOP signals infrastructure bill must wait Lobbying World MORE (R-Okla.), who has authored a book claiming that climate change was the “biggest hoax” ever perpetrated on mankind, said Democrats didn’t have the votes to pass major legislation that could affect climate change, such as a carbon tax, which was why the administration was implementing more regulations.

“I know they’ll enjoy staying up all night and they’ll have an audience of themselves,” Inhofe said. “It’s been virtually impossible to pass a cap and trade bill.”

Whitehouse has said he wants to make climate change a major issue in the 2014 election.

Notably, vulnerable Democrats such as Sens. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE (La.), Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska) and Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) didn’t participate in the all-nighter.

-- This report was updated at 9:54 a.m.