Ayotte: ‘We must act now’ on more Russian sanctions
© Greg Nash

Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteExplaining Democratic victories: It’s gun violence, stupid Trump voter fraud panel member fights back against critics Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada MORE (R-N.H.) said she is drafting legislation that would place U.S. sanctions on Russia’s banks and energy sector.

“The administration should not delay any longer in imposing immediate and severe sanctions on Russia's banking and financial sector,” Ayotte said Tuesday. “We must act now — before it's too late.”

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Shortly after Russia annexed Crimea, Congress passed legislation that sanctions Russian leaders involved in the invasion of part of Ukraine. The bill also provided a $1 billion loan to Ukraine to help maintain independence from Russia in the rest of the country. 

But many lawmakers are concerned Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t satisfied with just part of Ukraine and that his aggression will continue unless more is done. Putin now has troops along the eastern border as well and Ukraine was forced to some military action this week to protect its sovereignty.

Ayotte could introduce her legislation when the Senate returns from a two-week recess at the end of the month.

“The legislation I'm crafting would impose immediate additional sanctions on the Russian economy, with even harsher sanctions — such as on Russia's energy sector — if Putin takes further aggressive actions against Ukraine,” Ayotte said. “My proposal would also authorize provisions to provide critical support to the Ukrainian military.”

Ayotte isn’t the only lawmaker calling for more action from the Obama administration.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCongress faces growing health care crisis in Puerto Rico The Hill's 12:30 Report Colbert mocks Trump for sipping water during speech on Asia trip MORE (R-Fla.), a possible 2016 GOP presidential nominee, said Tuesday that Obama should “immediately” increase sanctions on Russia.

“Sector-based sanctions should begin to be imposed and President Putin’s own financial assets, and those of his associates, targeted,” Rubio said. “By delaying the most significant penalties, the United States and our allies have unfortunately sent the message to Russia that there will be little cost to pay for this type of behavior.”