Senate Republicans plan to offer their own legislation in response to the Supreme Court's ruling on the ObamaCare birth control mandate.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Overnight Finance: Lawmakers see shutdown odds rising | Trump calls for looser rules for bank loans | Consumer bureau moves to revise payday lending rule | Trump warns China on trade deficit MORE (R-Ky.) said Republicans plan to put forward a bill that would ensure employers cannot prevent their employees from obtaining contraception.

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“We plan to introduce legislation this week that says no employer can block any employee from legal access to her FDA-approved contraceptives," McConnell said. “There’s no disagreement on that fundamental point.”

The legislation appears to be an attempt by Senate Republicans to address an emotional political issue that Democrats have made central to their midterm election campaign.

The Supreme Court ruled last month that some closely held private companies cannot be required to offer birth control in their healthcare plans if they have religious objections, though the justices said they were open to an "accommodation" that could bypass those concerns.

While Republicans hailed the ruling as a victory for religious freedom, Democrats denounced it and are pushing legislation that would bar private employers from denying birth control in their health coverage plans.

On Wednesday, the Senate will hold the first procedural vote on S. 2578, a bill from Sens. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayCDC director to miss fourth hearing because of potential ethics issues Week ahead: Lawmakers near deal on children's health funding Ryan suggests room for bipartisanship on ObamaCare MORE (D-Wash.) and Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (D-Colo.) that takes on the ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

McConnell, who is facing a tough reelection fight against Alison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky, accused Democrats of exaggerating the implications of the high court's decision.

“Democrats are just attempting to offer another false choice here,” McConnell said. “What we’re saying is that of course you can support both religious freedom and access to contraception.”

Democrats have pounced on the issue ahead of the November elections to try to fire up their base, and they are pushing changes to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act that the high court cited in its decision.

“This case has unjustly singled out women’s healthcare services,” Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Billionaire Steyer to push for Dem House push Billionaire Steyer announces million for Dem House push MORE (D-Calif.) said Tuesday. “I don’t know a single healthcare provider who is dropping the coverage of Viagra — put the pieces together yourself. … I think that this decision discriminates against women.”