Senate Republicans introduced a bill Wednesday that would set a deadline for nuclear negotiations with Iran.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerDem Iraq War vets renew AUMF push on 15th anniversary of war Senate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support Senate, Trump clash over Saudi Arabia MORE (R-Tenn.) is the lead sponsor of the Iran Nuclear Negotiation Act. Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSteyer brings his push to impeach Trump to town halls across the nation Trump formally sends Pompeo nomination to Senate GOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone MORE (R-S.C.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump congratulated Putin after his national security team told him not to: report Trump faces backlash after congratulating Putin on election win McCain rips Trump's congratulatory call to Putin as an insult to Russian people MORE (R-Ariz.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: McCabe 'should've been allowed to finish through the weekend' For Tillerson, bucking Trump became a job-killer At least six dead after pedestrian bridge collapses on cars in Florida MORE (R-Fla.) are cosponsors.

Corker said the bill would allow congressional review of any deal, require the Director of National Intelligence to report to Congress on any violations by Iran to the agreement, and sets a deadline for negotiations.

If the administration doesn’t have a final comprehensive agreement by Nov. 28, U.S. sanctions against Iran would go back in place.

“I strongly support vigorous diplomatic efforts to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran, but it must be clear that there will be no more extensions,” Corker said. “Congress must weigh in on any final deal.”

The administration recently asked for an extension to reach a deal with Iran. Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryKentucky candidate takes heat for tweeting he'd like to use congressman for target practice Breitbart editor: Biden's son inked deal with Chinese government days after vice president’s trip State lawmakers pushing for carbon taxes aimed at the poor MORE is trying to stop Iran from developing a nuclear weapons program in exchange for lifting some economic sanctions.

“I am more convinced than ever that these negotiations are unlikely to result in an agreement with Iran that prevents it from developing a nuclear weapon,” Rubio said. “By unilaterally making major concessions to the Iranians, the administration is laying the groundwork for a very bad deal. It is essential that Congress have the opportunity to fully examine, debate and vote on any deal concluded with Iran.”