Senate Republicans introduced a bill Wednesday that would set a deadline for nuclear negotiations with Iran.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPressure rising on GOP after Trump–DOJ fight’s latest turn Corker turns downs Trump's offer to be ambassador to Australia Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA MORE (R-Tenn.) is the lead sponsor of the Iran Nuclear Negotiation Act. Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Graham: Trump will 'end North Korea’s threat to the American homeland' in his first term Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in after Texas school shooting MORE (R-S.C.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainOvernight Defense: Pompeo lays out new Iran terms | Pentagon hints at more aggressive posture against Iran | House, Senate move on defense bill Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Sarah Sanders: ‘Democrats are losing their war against women in the Trump administration’ MORE (R-Ariz.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: Kaepernick deserves to be in the NFL Congress — when considering women’s health, don’t forget about lung cancer Anti-Maduro Venezuelans not unlike anti-Castro Cubans of yore MORE (R-Fla.) are cosponsors.

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Corker said the bill would allow congressional review of any deal, require the Director of National Intelligence to report to Congress on any violations by Iran to the agreement, and sets a deadline for negotiations.

If the administration doesn’t have a final comprehensive agreement by Nov. 28, U.S. sanctions against Iran would go back in place.

“I strongly support vigorous diplomatic efforts to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran, but it must be clear that there will be no more extensions,” Corker said. “Congress must weigh in on any final deal.”

The administration recently asked for an extension to reach a deal with Iran. Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryJohn Kerry to NYU Abu Dhabi: We can't address world problems by 'going it alone' Juan Williams: Trump's dangerous lies on Iran Pompeo: US tried, failed to achieve side deal with European allies MORE is trying to stop Iran from developing a nuclear weapons program in exchange for lifting some economic sanctions.

“I am more convinced than ever that these negotiations are unlikely to result in an agreement with Iran that prevents it from developing a nuclear weapon,” Rubio said. “By unilaterally making major concessions to the Iranians, the administration is laying the groundwork for a very bad deal. It is essential that Congress have the opportunity to fully examine, debate and vote on any deal concluded with Iran.”