Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidVirginia was a wave election, but without real change, the tide will turn again Top Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor MORE (D-Nev.) late Wednesday night said that the Senate has reached an agreement on how to move ahead with a long-stalled transportation authorization bill.

Reid took to the Senate floor shortly before 10:30 p.m. to announce that Republicans and Democrats agreed to allow votes on up to 30 amendments to the bill. That's a far cry from Reid's earlier attempt to approve the bill without any further consideration.

Nonetheless, Reid welcomed the agreement and said he hoped the Senate could finish the bill by Thursday.

"We've reached agreement… on the surface transportation bill," Reid said. "Under the order we just entered, we can finish this tomorrow.

ADVERTISEMENT
"It's a huge job. We have 30 amendments we have to dispose of. So there is no question that senators should expect a number of votes tomorrow."

Despite Reid's optimism, the Senate is expected to take up to ten amendment votes Thursday, and leave the rest for next week.

Among the amendments that will get a vote are ones from Sen. David VitterDavid VitterQuestions loom over Franken ethics probe You're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat Overnight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending MORE (R-La.) to extend oil and gas drilling permits in the Outer Continental Shelf, one from Sen. Tom CoburnTom CoburnFormer GOP senator: Trump has a personality disorder Lobbying World -trillion debt puts US fiscal house on very shaky ground MORE (R-Okla.) to eliminate duplicative federal programs and one from Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerBannon: McConnell 'picking up his game' because of our 'insurgent movement' State Dept. spokeswoman acknowledges 'morale issue' The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Tenn.) to reduce the 2013 discretionary spending cap. Another amendment authorizing the Keystone XL pipeline is also up for a vote.

The Keystone amendment, as well as the proposals from Vitter, Coburn and some others, will require a 60-vote threshold, making them unlikely to pass.

The Senate bill authorizes transportation spending for two years, and would spend about $109 billion. The Senate returns at 9:30 a.m. and plans to take up the bill after an hour of morning debate.

— This story was updated at 11:14 p.m.