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In a voice vote George Russell was confirmed by the Senate for U.S. District Court judge. John Tharp, for the Northern District of Illinois, was confirmed 86 to 1. Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeRubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’ National ad campaign pushes Congress to pass legislation lowering drug prices Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (R-Utah) was the one dissenting vote.

"He's an extraordinarily talented individual," Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDems confront Kelly after he calls some immigrants 'lazy' McConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Hoyer: DACA deal a long ways off MORE (D-Ill.) said of Tharp ahead of the vote on the nominees. "What is interesting about Jay Tharp is that every aspect of his nomination has been bipartisan."

Tharp was part of a deal between Durbin and Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) to confirm two judicial nominees with the support of each other. Durbin agreed to support Tharp's nomination as long as Kirk supported John Z. Lee, who was confirmed for the Northern District of Illinois a week earlier. Kirk, who suffered a stroke in January, was unable to come to the Senate floor to vote for Tharp.

Russell also received praise ahead of the vote.

"This judge, Judge Russell, has public service in his DNA," Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiRobert Mueller's forgotten surveillance crime spree Clinton: White House slow-walking Russia sanctions Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns MORE (D-Md.) said ahead of the vote. "He's a devoted public servant, he comes with a great background, he brings together recommendations from both the public and private sector and I urge my colleagues for endorsing the nomination of Judge Russell and I ask their support in voting for him."

Both Republicans and Democrats have accused the opposing party of causing judicial vacancies either by stalling on confirmations or picking nominees that clearly would not have bipartisan support.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Overnight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Grassley to Sessions: Policy for employees does not comply with the law MORE (R-Iowa), the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee said Democrats were wrong to accuse Republicans of obstructing judicial nominees. He noted that so far 25 more nominees had been confirmed during President Obama's term than all of President George W. Bush's time in office.

"The fact of the matter is that President Obama is being treated much more fairly than Democrats treated President Bush," Grassley said.

The Senate adjourned after it confirmed its nominees and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack House presses Senate GOP on filibuster reform A pro-science approach to Yucca Mountain appropriations MORE (D-Nev.) announced that a vote moving legislation reauthorizing the Export-Import bank would be held on Tuesday. The chamber gavels in at 10 a.m. 

—This story was updated at 6:47 p.m.