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The chamber voted 90-8 on a cloture vote on a motion to proceed to the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (S. 3240). Republican Sens. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnRepublicans in Congress shouldn't try to bring back earmarks Republicans should know reviving earmarks is a political nightmare Former GOP senator: Trump has a personality disorder MORE (Okla.), John CornynJohn CornynMcCarthy: ‘No deadline on DACA’ NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Hoyer suggests Dems won't support spending bill without DACA fix MORE (Texas), Jim DeMint (S.C.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchKoch groups: Don't renew expired tax breaks in government funding bill Hatch tweets link to 'invisible' glasses after getting spotted removing pair that wasn't there DHS giving ‘active defense’ cyber tools to private sector, secretary says MORE (Utah), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Nevada Dems unveil 2018 campaign mascot: 'Mitch McTurtle' Senate campaign fundraising reports roll in MORE (Nev.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeEPA's Pruitt: Bring back 'true environmentalism' Tax cut complete, hawks push for military increase Trump meets with oil-state GOP senators on ethanol mandate MORE (Okla.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators eager for Romney to join them The House needs to help patients from being victimized by antiquated technology Comey’s original Clinton memo released, cites possible violations MORE (Wis.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle With religious liberty memo, Trump made America free to be faithful again This week: Time running out for Congress to avoid shutdown MORE (Utah) voted against the motion. The bill needed 60 votes to advance.

"We’ve performed our duty to taxpayers by cutting deficit spending while at the same time strengthening and preserving the programs so important to agriculture and rural America," Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsGOP senators eager for Romney to join them Canada tamps down worries about US NAFTA withdrawal Canada worried Trump will withdraw from NAFTA: report MORE (R-Kan.), who co-sponsored the bill, said after the vote. "We’ve cut mandatory spending by $23.6 billion. We’ve reformed, eliminated and streamlined USDA programs to the tune of more than 100 programs and authorizations eliminated. We’ve done it on a voluntary basis and in a bipartisan fashion. Simply put, this bill is common-sense reform and needs to be approved now to provide certainty for our farmers and ranchers to make planning decisions and to help our economic recovery."

Both Democrats and Republicans have expressed support for the bill, which ends direct payments to farmers based on historical production. Under that payment system, farmers who don't grow crops anymore can still receive money. The question going forward now is whether legislators will be able to agree on how many and which amendments to consider adding to the bill. Agreements on amendments have been a deciding factor for movement on recent legislation in the Senate. If Senate Republicans and Democrats cannot agree on how many and which amendments to consider, the legislation is likely to stall in the chamber.

In the days before the vote, senators began introducing amendments, some of which were not directly related to the farm bill, like an amendment by Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Fix what we’ve got and make Medicare right this year Despite amnesty, DACA bill favors American wage-earners MORE (R-Ky.) cutting off aid to Pakistan until a doctor who helped the CIA find Osama bin Laden is released from prison. Another amendment, by Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTrump thinks he could easily beat Sanders in 2020 match-up: report Listen: EMILY’s List upbeat about Dem House in '19 Desperate Democrats shouldn't settle for Oprah MORE (D-N.Y.), blocks cuts to food stamps included in the farm bill.

Prior to the vote, Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSenate Finance Dems want more transparency on trade from Trump Prominent Michigan Republican drops out of Senate primary GOP chairman shoots down Democrat effort to delay tax work until Jones is seated MORE (D-Mich.), who sponsored the farm bill, said that unrelated amendments did not belong in the legislation.

"Amendments that have nothing to do with agriculture do not belong in the farm bill and delay the Senate’s ability to get its job done," Stabenow said ahead of the vote.