The effort is aimed at calling attention during an election year to the massive amounts of spending by outside groups on the election. While President Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney have both welcomed the help of super-PACs that can take unlimited political donations, their efforts are expected to give Romney a funding advantage.

“We recognize that you don’t win every fight in round one, and this is a fight worth continuing,” the Senate bill’s lead sponsor, Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate Dems to Mnuchin: Don't index capital gains to inflation EPA extends comment period on controversial science transparency rule House easily passes prison reform bill backed by Trump MORE (D-R.I.), said Monday in a statement.

“Putting an end to secret election spending by special interests is an essential step in protecting middle class priorities. For that reason, we are committed to continuing the debate on the DISCLOSE Act late into the night and asking for a second vote tomorrow if need be,” he said.

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Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis Schumer'Right to try' is a win for patient rights and President Trump Overnight Finance: White House planning new tax cut proposal this summer | Schumer wants Congress to block reported ZTE deal | Tech scrambles to comply with new data rules OPEC and Russia may raise oil output under pressure from Trump MORE (N.Y.), the Democrats' messaging leader in the upper chamber, is leading the effort.

The legislation is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision, which allowed unlimited and anonymous campaign contributions to outside groups. The groups are not allowed to be connected to a candidate’s campaign.

Democrats have argued that the Citizens United decision is anti-democratic because it allows corporations and the wealthy a greater say in elections without requiring those interests to publicly reveal their contributions.

“We believe that all of the unlimited cash allowed by the Citizens United decision must at least be disclosed,” Schumer said. “This legislation seeks to limit the damage of the Supreme Court decision that has given corporations and the very wealthy unprecedented sway over our elections, and represents one of the most serious threats to the future of our democracy.”

“We are determined to prove that transparency is not a radical concept,” said Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallDem senator presses EPA over reporter 'intimidation' Dems expand 2018 message to ‘draining the swamp’ Overnight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus MORE (D-N.M.). “Our bill is as simple and straightforward as it gets — if you are making large donations to influence an election, the voters in that election should know who you are. The American people are blessed with common sense. They know that when someone will not admit to something, it is usually because there is something to hide.”

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