The effort is aimed at calling attention during an election year to the massive amounts of spending by outside groups on the election. While President Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney have both welcomed the help of super-PACs that can take unlimited political donations, their efforts are expected to give Romney a funding advantage.

“We recognize that you don’t win every fight in round one, and this is a fight worth continuing,” the Senate bill’s lead sponsor, Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate Finance Dems want more transparency on trade from Trump Trump, Kushner meet with advocates on prison reform Democrats search for Russians — any Russians — for collusion story MORE (D-R.I.), said Monday in a statement.

“Putting an end to secret election spending by special interests is an essential step in protecting middle class priorities. For that reason, we are committed to continuing the debate on the DISCLOSE Act late into the night and asking for a second vote tomorrow if need be,” he said.

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Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats will need to explain if they shut government down over illegal immigration White House: Trump remarks didn't derail shutdown talks Schumer defends Durbin after GOP senator questions account of Trump meeting MORE (N.Y.), the Democrats' messaging leader in the upper chamber, is leading the effort.

The legislation is a response to the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision, which allowed unlimited and anonymous campaign contributions to outside groups. The groups are not allowed to be connected to a candidate’s campaign.

Democrats have argued that the Citizens United decision is anti-democratic because it allows corporations and the wealthy a greater say in elections without requiring those interests to publicly reveal their contributions.

“We believe that all of the unlimited cash allowed by the Citizens United decision must at least be disclosed,” Schumer said. “This legislation seeks to limit the damage of the Supreme Court decision that has given corporations and the very wealthy unprecedented sway over our elections, and represents one of the most serious threats to the future of our democracy.”

“We are determined to prove that transparency is not a radical concept,” said Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallCongress has been broken by the special interests – here’s how we fix it Senate GOP seeks to change rules for Trump picks Dems celebrate Jones victory in Alabama race MORE (D-N.M.). “Our bill is as simple and straightforward as it gets — if you are making large donations to influence an election, the voters in that election should know who you are. The American people are blessed with common sense. They know that when someone will not admit to something, it is usually because there is something to hide.”

Other Democrats participating in the “vigil” are Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSupreme Court to hear online sales tax case State official indicates US military role in Syria post-ISIS centered on Iran Overnight Health Care: Dems press HHS pick on drug prices | Alexander, Trump discuss ObamaCare fix | Senate Dems seek B to fight opioids | Maryland eyes ObamaCare mandate replacement MORE (N.H.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyEarly tax bill reality very different than Democratic rhetoric Senate GOP seeks to change rules for Trump picks Dem senators tear into Trump: Tax bill 'a very big Christmas gift from Trump to himself' MORE (Ore.), Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDurbin: Senators to release immigration bill Wednesday Trump's 's---hole' controversy shows no sign of easing Dem senator: 'No question' Trump's 's---hole countries' comment is racist MORE (Colo.) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenPawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota EMILY’s List president: Franken did 'right thing for Minnesota' Dem pledges to ask all court nominees about sexual harassment history under oath MORE (Minn.).