Last week McCain told the Hill that it would take a major scandal before there is enough political will on Capitol Hill to pass another campaign finance reform bill.

“What I really think is that it’s going to take a scandal and there’s going to be one. There’s just too much money washing around,” McCain said. “Every time in history there have been these reforms it’s been following a scandal. It’s what it’s going to take, I think.”

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That didn’t stop Democrats from questioning why the DISCLOSE Act did not have more bipartisan support, as McCain-Feingold did.

“This should be a bipartisan issue,” Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharFranken resignation could upend Minnesota races Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics MORE (D-Minn.) said Monday night. “Sens. McCain and Feingold championed campaign finance reform for years and this is a much less drastic change.”

The DISCLOSE Act bill would have required companies, unions and other entities to report campaign spending of more than $10,000.

“I do know that campaign finance, which was a bipartisan issue in this chamber in 2003, where Sen. Feingold and Sen. McCain, a Democrat and Republican, lead a strong bipartisan coalition to reign in the negative influence of special interest money,” Sen. Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate ethics panel wants details on sexual harassment allegations American innovation depends on strengthening patents Tax reform and innovation – good news and a cloud MORE (D-Del.) said. “That has changed to, today sadly, a starkly partisan issue.”