Campaign finance reformer McCain votes against DISCLOSE bill because it favors labor

Last week McCain told the Hill that it would take a major scandal before there is enough political will on Capitol Hill to pass another campaign finance reform bill.

“What I really think is that it’s going to take a scandal and there’s going to be one. There’s just too much money washing around,” McCain said. “Every time in history there have been these reforms it’s been following a scandal. It’s what it’s going to take, I think.”

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That didn’t stop Democrats from questioning why the DISCLOSE Act did not have more bipartisan support, as McCain-Feingold did.

“This should be a bipartisan issue,” Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharOvernight Defense: US attempted hostage rescue in Afghanistan | Defense hawks brace for spending fight | Trump slams 'lies' about Iraq war stance Senators want military separation policy to address trauma-related behavior Senate Dems reignite fight for hearing on SCOTUS nominee MORE (D-Minn.) said Monday night. “Sens. McCain and Feingold championed campaign finance reform for years and this is a much less drastic change.”

The DISCLOSE Act bill would have required companies, unions and other entities to report campaign spending of more than $10,000.

“I do know that campaign finance, which was a bipartisan issue in this chamber in 2003, where Sen. Feingold and Sen. McCain, a Democrat and Republican, lead a strong bipartisan coalition to reign in the negative influence of special interest money,” Sen. Chris CoonsChris CoonsOvernight Healthcare: McConnell unveils new Zika package | Manchin defends daughter on EpiPens | Bill includes M for opioid crisis Dems to GOP: Help us fix ObamaCare Cruz fights domain name handover in hearing MORE (D-Del.) said. “That has changed to, today sadly, a starkly partisan issue.”