Earlier in the week, Republicans also blocked the Disclose Act, which would have required the disclosure of campaign contributions of more than $10,000.

Republicans were considering supporting the insourcing bill until Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems face identity crisis Heller under siege, even before healthcare Charles Koch thanks Harry Reid for helping his book sales MORE (D-Nev.) said he wouldn't include any GOP amendments.

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“At a time when millions of Americans are looking for work, I’m not sure what could be more serious than protecting good-paying, middle-class jobs,” Reid said. “This obstruction tactic is unfortunate, but it’s not surprising. After all, Republicans’ nominee for president made a fortune working for a company that shipped jobs overseas.”

The Bring Jobs Home Act would have created a new tax credit for companies that spend money to bring overseas jobs back to the United States, and eliminate a tax credit for companies that spend money to move jobs overseas.

Under current law, companies can deduct the cost of moving people and equipment overseas from their taxes. S. 3364 would have eliminated that deduction, and created a new 20 percent tax credit for all costs associated with moving overseas jobs back to America.

Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsGOP ObamaCare fight faces do-or-die procedural vote The Memo: Trump seeks to put his stamp on nation Johnson becomes fourth GOP senator unwilling to proceed on healthcare bill MORE (Maine), Olympia Snowe (Maine), Dean HellerDean HellerGOP ObamaCare fight faces do-or-die procedural vote The Memo: Trump seeks to put his stamp on nation Heller under siege, even before healthcare MORE (Nev.) and Scott Brown (Mass.) voted in favor of the measure. But other Republicans called the bill “political” and “misleading.”

“On the surface this might sound reasonable ... but as far as tax policy goes this is a joke,” said ranking member of the Finance Committee Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchChaffetz calls for ,500 legislator housing stipend Industry 'surprised' by DOJ appeal in data warrant case US, South Korea can bury the trade barrier hatchet this week MORE (R-Utah). “It’s devoid of serious content because it is product of political rather than economic priorities.”

Reid said the bill was very serious to those losing their jobs.

“To 21 million Americans whose jobs could be the next ones sent to China or India, it’s a very serious proposal,” Reid said. “And to the 2.5 million Americans who jobs have already been offshored, it doesn’t get any more serious than this. The only ones who aren’t taking this legislation seriously are Republicans in Congress.”

Sen. Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowNo certainty on cost-sharing payments to insurers Dems express concerns about Trump's proposed rural development cuts Trump, Clinton campaign aides launch their own bids MORE (D-Mich.) introduced the bill as a jobs measure.

"It's time to stop rewarding companies that send jobs to other countries and instead support businesses creating jobs here at home," she said.