Those in support of the bill say it’s vital to national security.

ADVERTISEMENT
“Failing to act on cybersecurity legislation not only puts our national security at risk, it recklessly endangers members of our armed forces and missions around the world,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems see surge of new candidates Dems to grind Senate to a halt over ObamaCare repeal fight GOP fires opening attack on Dem reportedly running for Heller's Senate seat MORE (D-Nev.) said. “If we’re serious about protecting our troops, we must protect them against cyber attacks.”

The Senate will vote on a motion to end debate on a motion to proceed to the bill Friday, unless an agreement is reached sooner. In closing business Wednesday evening, Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseJudiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting GOP hits the gas on ObamaCare repeal Dems limited in their ability to slow ObamaCare vote MORE (D-R.I.) said leadership is hoping an agreement is reached to have a vote Thursday.

S. 3414 was introduced by Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsThe Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill What’s in the Senate healthcare bill Senate GOP bill defunds Planned Parenthood for one year MORE (R-Maine), Tom CarperTom CarperOvernight Energy: Lawmakers challenge Trump's proposed EPA cuts Overnight Energy: Tillerson maintains support for Paris deal despite Trump decision Overnight Regulation: FDA puts new nutrition labels on hold MORE (D-Del.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinGrassley doesn't see how Judiciary 'can avoid' obstruction probe Senators grill Perry on Yucca nuclear storage plans Judiciary Committee to continue Russia probe after Mueller meeting MORE (D-Calif.), John RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE (D-W.Va.) and Whitehouse.

But not all Republicans support the measure. Sen. John McCainJohn McCainThe Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Meghan McCain slams 'felon' Dinesh D'Souza over tweets mocking father's captivity White House launches ObamaCare repeal web page MORE (R-Ariz.) the bill is flawed and won’t pass in the House.

“The Major Leader intends to rush through the Senate a flawed piece of legislation,” McCain said Monday. “The cyber security bill is in great need of improvements … [and] it has zero chance of passing in the House of Representatives.”

McCain — who has a competing bill, the Secure It Act — said he thinks it’s far more important to pass the defense authorization bill than the Cybersecurity Act.

“Can’t we as a body for the sake of those men and women who’s lives are on the line pass a defense authorization bill,” McCain said. “For the life of me I do not understand why the Majority Leader should have so little regard for the men and women serving in the military today.”

Collins pushed back saying the Senate must act now.

“We must act and we must act now,” Collins said Wednesday. “We can’t afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before taking action on this legislation.”

When originally proposed the bill got push back from industry groups and some lawmakers concerned about Internet privacy. But Collins said many changes have been made to the bill.

“We have revised our bill in a very substantial way,” Collins said citing that many of the standards related to the private sector are now optional. “This shows a willingness to adopt changes and we’re still open to changes.”

The Senate is adjourned until 9:30 a.m. Thursday.