Those in support of the bill say it’s vital to national security.

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“Failing to act on cybersecurity legislation not only puts our national security at risk, it recklessly endangers members of our armed forces and missions around the world,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Memo: Trump pulls off a stone-cold stunner The Memo: Ending DACA a risky move for Trump Manchin pressed from both sides in reelection fight MORE (D-Nev.) said. “If we’re serious about protecting our troops, we must protect them against cyber attacks.”

The Senate will vote on a motion to end debate on a motion to proceed to the bill Friday, unless an agreement is reached sooner. In closing business Wednesday evening, Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseJuan Williams: Momentum builds against gerrymandering Overnight Regulation: FTC launches probe into Equifax | Dems propose tougher data security rules | NYC aims to slash greenhouse gas emissions | EPA to reconsider Obama coal ash rule Overnight Cybersecurity: Kaspersky to testify before House | US sanctions Iranians over cyberattacks | Equifax reveals flaw that led to hack MORE (D-R.I.) said leadership is hoping an agreement is reached to have a vote Thursday.

S. 3414 was introduced by Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Ryan: Graham-Cassidy 'best, last chance' to repeal ObamaCare Collins skeptical of new ObamaCare repeal effort MORE (R-Maine), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperIt’s time for Congress to actually fix the individual health insurance market Where Dems stand on Sanders's single-payer bill Trump riles Dems with pick for powerful EPA job MORE (D-Del.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDems call for action against Cassidy-Graham ObamaCare repeal Feinstein pushes back on Trump’s N. Korea policy Feinstein on reelection bid: ‘We will see’ MORE (D-Calif.), Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE (D-W.Va.) and Whitehouse.

But not all Republicans support the measure. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate's defense authorization would set cyber doctrine Senate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions MORE (R-Ariz.) the bill is flawed and won’t pass in the House.

“The Major Leader intends to rush through the Senate a flawed piece of legislation,” McCain said Monday. “The cyber security bill is in great need of improvements … [and] it has zero chance of passing in the House of Representatives.”

McCain — who has a competing bill, the Secure It Act — said he thinks it’s far more important to pass the defense authorization bill than the Cybersecurity Act.

“Can’t we as a body for the sake of those men and women who’s lives are on the line pass a defense authorization bill,” McCain said. “For the life of me I do not understand why the Majority Leader should have so little regard for the men and women serving in the military today.”

Collins pushed back saying the Senate must act now.

“We must act and we must act now,” Collins said Wednesday. “We can’t afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before taking action on this legislation.”

When originally proposed the bill got push back from industry groups and some lawmakers concerned about Internet privacy. But Collins said many changes have been made to the bill.

“We have revised our bill in a very substantial way,” Collins said citing that many of the standards related to the private sector are now optional. “This shows a willingness to adopt changes and we’re still open to changes.”

The Senate is adjourned until 9:30 a.m. Thursday.