Those in support of the bill say it’s vital to national security.

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“Failing to act on cybersecurity legislation not only puts our national security at risk, it recklessly endangers members of our armed forces and missions around the world,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) said. “If we’re serious about protecting our troops, we must protect them against cyber attacks.”

The Senate will vote on a motion to end debate on a motion to proceed to the bill Friday, unless an agreement is reached sooner. In closing business Wednesday evening, Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Regulation: Net neutrality supporters predict tough court battle | Watchdog to investigate EPA chief's meeting with industry group | Ex-Volkswagen exec gets 7 years for emissions cheating Overnight Energy: Watchdog probes Pruitt speech to mining group | EPA chief promises to let climate scientists present their work | Volkswagen manager gets 7 years for emissions cheating EPA head pledges to protect climate scientists MORE (D-R.I.) said leadership is hoping an agreement is reached to have a vote Thursday.

S. 3414 was introduced by Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids Study: ObamaCare bills backed by Collins would lower premiums Right scrambles GOP budget strategy MORE (R-Maine), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperAvalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Overnight Cybersecurity: Mueller probe cost .7M in early months | Senate confirms Homeland Security nominee | Consumer agency limits data collection | Arrest in Andromeda botnet investigation Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank MORE (D-Del.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Blumenthal: ‘Credible case' of obstruction of justice can be made against Trump MORE (D-Calif.), John RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE (D-W.Va.) and Whitehouse.

But not all Republicans support the measure. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Meghan McCain knocks Bannon: 'Who the hell are you' to criticize Romney? Dems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress MORE (R-Ariz.) the bill is flawed and won’t pass in the House.

“The Major Leader intends to rush through the Senate a flawed piece of legislation,” McCain said Monday. “The cyber security bill is in great need of improvements … [and] it has zero chance of passing in the House of Representatives.”

McCain — who has a competing bill, the Secure It Act — said he thinks it’s far more important to pass the defense authorization bill than the Cybersecurity Act.

“Can’t we as a body for the sake of those men and women who’s lives are on the line pass a defense authorization bill,” McCain said. “For the life of me I do not understand why the Majority Leader should have so little regard for the men and women serving in the military today.”

Collins pushed back saying the Senate must act now.

“We must act and we must act now,” Collins said Wednesday. “We can’t afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before taking action on this legislation.”

When originally proposed the bill got push back from industry groups and some lawmakers concerned about Internet privacy. But Collins said many changes have been made to the bill.

“We have revised our bill in a very substantial way,” Collins said citing that many of the standards related to the private sector are now optional. “This shows a willingness to adopt changes and we’re still open to changes.”

The Senate is adjourned until 9:30 a.m. Thursday.