Reid said he hopes he and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump stays out of Arizona's ugly and costly GOP fight Sen. Warner to introduce amendment limiting Trump’s ability to revoke security clearances The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Ky.) can agree to proceed to the bill Thursday; if not, a vote to proceed to the bill will take place Friday morning.

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Reid said he has ideas on how to better the bill, too.

“In my view, it’s not strong enough,” Reid said. “But it’s a tremendous move forward.”

Reid said he wants committees to start working on a list of amendments because the issue is critical to national security.

“Unless we do something, it’s not a question of if, it’s a question of when,” Reid said of the chances of a cyberattack.

Republicans have recently criticized Reid for not being more open during the amendment process.

The Cybersecurity Act aims to protect American from cyberattacks against the Web, electrical grid, banking systems, military operations, transportation networks and others.

S. 3414 was introduced by Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsWhite House weighs clawing back State, foreign aid funding The Hill's Morning Report: Dems have a majority in the Senate (this week) Overnight Defense: Pompeo creates 'action group' for Iran policy | Trump escalates intel feud | Report pegs military parade cost at M MORE (R-Maine), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperSenate panel spars with Trump administration over treatment of unaccompanied immigrant children Senate study: Trump hasn’t provided adequate support to detained migrant children Overnight Energy: Trump elephant trophy tweets blindsided staff | Execs of chemical plant that exploded during hurricane indicted | Interior to reverse pesticide ban at wildlife refuges MORE (D-Del.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats question if Kavanaugh lied about work on terrorism policy Dems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints Progressives fume as Dems meet with Brett Kavanaugh MORE (D-Calif.), Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) and Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Defense: Officials make show of force on election security | Dems want probe into Air Force One tours | Pentagon believes Korean War remains 'consistent' with Americans Dems call for investigation of Trump Air Force One tours Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press MORE (D-R.I.).

“We must act and we must act now,” Collins said Wednesday. “We can’t afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before taking action on this legislation.”

Lawmakers have been meeting this week to find common ground. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe Hill's 12:30 Report Senate gets to work in August — but many don’t show up Rand Paul’s Russia visit displays advancement of peace through diplomacy MORE (R-Ariz.) has introduced a competing bill, the Secure It Act.

When originally proposed, S. 3414 received pushback from industry groups and some lawmakers concerned about Internet privacy. But Collins said many changes have been made to the bill.

“We have revised our bill in a very substantial way,” Collins said, citing that many of the standards related to the private sector are now optional. “This shows a willingness to adopt changes and we’re still open to changes.”