Four senators have called on China's U.S. ambassador to crack down on Chinese companies that are producing fake U.S. driver's licenses and other documents.

The letter to Ambassador Zhang Yesui from Sens. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinHannity, Kimmel, Farrow among Time's '100 Most Influential' The Hill's Morning Report: 200 Days to the Election Dems walk tightrope on Pompeo nomination MORE (D-Ill.), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley: McConnell doesn't control my committee Senate panel punts Mueller protection bill to next week GOP senator: Congress needs ‘to move on’ from Russia probe MORE (R-Iowa) and Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinDem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Trump should require federal contractors to follow the law MORE (D-Iowa) follows a June USA Today article that said production of these fake documents is growing. The article also said the companies are making it easy for people to order fake documents online.

"Counterfeit identification documents violate our nation's laws and undermine the efforts of federal, state and local law enforcement to keep our communities safe," they wrote. "Given the obvious public safety and national security risks, we write to request that the Chinese government take immediate action against these companies."

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The letter said that in 2011, more than 1,700 fake driver's licenses were seized at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, and said Chicago IDs are some of the most counterfeited. It cited one company, ID Chief, as the largest producer of fake IDs, and said these companies are clearly aware that they are breaking the law because they try to hide their fake documents when they mail them out.

"The companies understand the harm in their behavior, which is why they mail the identification documents to their customers concealed in puzzles or clothing," they wrote.

"These companies are profiting form the facilitation of crimes committed in the United States, and provide no legitimate service," they said. "We ask the Chinese government to take a strong stance and work to put an end to these companies."