The FTC ruling means that Brian-Pad Inc. will no longer be able to make claims that its products reduce the risk of concussion without conducting a scientific study that proves those claims.

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"Increased awareness of the dangers associated with sports concussions is extremely important," said Udall. "But as the Brain-Pad settlement proves, some companies seem to be taking advantage of the fears of parents, coaches and athletes. The real danger behind anti-concussion marketing claims is in giving young athletes and their parents a false sense of security.”

Udall introduced the Children's Sports Athletic Equipment Safety Act, S. 601, which would increase potential penalties for companies using false injury prevention claims to sell helmets and other sports equipment. The bill would also ensure that new and reconditioned football helmets for high school and younger players meet safety standards that address concussion risks for young athletes.

"Concussions are a very serious health concern, especially for young athletes, and it is important that athletes, parents and coaches know the truth about the limitations of sports equipment in preventing concussions,” Rockefeller said.

Democratic Sens. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalOnly Congress can enable drone technology to reach its full potential Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Dems urge Sessions to reject AT&T-Time Warner merger MORE (Conn.), Frank Lautenberg (N.J.) and Charles SchumerCharles SchumerFCC advances proposal to unmask blocked caller ID in threat cases Trump: Pelosi's leadership good for the GOP Live coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (N.Y.) are all co-sponsors of Udall's bill.