“This bill says all good ideas are welcome because our veterans need all the help they can get and it’s fully paid for in a bipartisan way,” Senate Veterans Affairs Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySpending bill would double child care funding for low-income families Funding bill gives billion boost for NIH medical research Spending bill prevents employers from pocketing tips under tip-pooling rule MORE (D-Wash.) said in a floor speech Tuesday. “Our veterans don’t ask for a lot ... but our veterans shouldn’t have to ask, we should know how to provide for them.”

The $1 billion bill would pay for itself by allowing the IRS to more actively go after some who have failed to pay taxes — new revenue.

Debate on the bill will continue as leadership works toward an agreement on amendments. If they agree, a roll-call vote will likely happen later this week.

“Veterans returning home from across the country are watching us and they certainly don’t have time for politics to block they’re ability to get a job,” Murray said.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHouse poised to vote on .3T spending bill Overnight Finance: Lawmakers race to finalize omnibus | What we know about funding bill | White House on board | Fed raises rates for first time under Powell Senate passes controversial online sex trafficking bill MORE (R-Ky.) voted against the bill.

Last month, the bill was introduced after the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that there were more than 225,000 unemployed post-9/11 veterans, who would be the benefactors of the legislation.

Murray and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonSteyer brings his push to impeach Trump to town halls across the nation Overnight Defense: Senate sides with Trump on military role in Yemen | Dem vets push for new war authorization on Iraq anniversary | General says time isn't 'right' for space corps Senate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support MORE led the effort for the legislation. Both pointed out before the vote that returning service members have valuable job skills, such as leadership ability, discipline, technical skills, teamwork and the ability to perform under pressure, because of their military training.

“When you met some of these folks young and old, they’ve already done the tough, tough job and then they come home and have tough times as well,” Nelson said. “They are extremely skilled. We need to give them as many opportunities to succeed when they get back here in America. It’s up to us to stand by our soldiers.”

The $1 billion bill establishes a Veterans Job Corps for five years. The bill would set up a pilot program that would allow veterans to search for jobs on a new website, and create “one-stop job centers” where they could receive help using the site, if needed. 

The bill also establishes a Transition Assistance Program for veterans and their spouses in a few states with the highest levels of unemployed vets.

Some veterans receive on-the-job training while in service, but that doesn’t always transfer over into civilian life. S. 3457 would make it easier for veterans to get job certifications and licenses in states by counting military training that’s relevant to become certified as a nursing assistant, or to get a commercial driver's license or an EMT license.

Democratic Sens. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAmtrak to rename Rochester station after Louise Slaughter Gillibrand endorses Cuomo for reelection Coalition presses Transportation Dept. for stricter oversight of driverless cars MORE (N.Y.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyBill to bolster gun background checks gains enough support to break filibuster Democrats remain skeptical of Trump’s rebuilding plan Dems to face off in Calif. nomination fights MORE (Ore.), Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerAmtrak to rename Rochester station after Louise Slaughter Conscience protections for health-care providers should be standard Pension committee must deliver on retirement promise MORE (N.Y.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSenators target 'gag clauses' that hide potential savings on prescriptions Nonprofit leaders look to continue work with lawmakers to strengthen charitable giving 10 Senate Democrats are up for reelection in Trump country MORE (Mich.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Cybersecurity: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica | Senators grill DHS chief on election security | Omnibus to include election cyber funds | Bill would create 'bug bounty' for State Senate passes controversial online sex trafficking bill GOP senator blocking Trump's Intel nominee MORE (Ore.) also co-sponsored the bill.