McConnell tees up vote on cybersecurity bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWarren on family separation policy: Trump is ‘taking America to a dark and ugly place’ Senate GOP tries to defuse Trump border crisis Schumer rejects GOP proposal to address border crisis MORE (R-Ky.) is teeing up a cybersecurity bill, paving the way for a first vote on Wednesday.

The Republican leader filed cloture on the motion to proceed to the long-stalled Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

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The move comes after a preliminary deal on amendments was reached. The move, if successful, could help get the bill passed before senators leave for a five-week break.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrFormer Senate intel aide indicted for perjury makes first court appearance The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Washington's week of 'we'll see' Former Senate Intel aide indicted in DOJ leak case MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border Dem plays audio from child detention center on Senate floor 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families MORE (D-Calif.), the top two lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Friday circulated a managers’ amendment that would address some of the privacy concerns that have slowed down the bill since March.

But Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Verizon, AT&T call off data partnerships after pressure | Tech speaks out against Trump family separation policy | T-Mobile, Sprint make case for B merger AT&T, Verizon say they'll stop sharing location data with third-party brokers The Memo: Child separation crisis risks ‘Katrina moment’ for Trump MORE (D-Ore.) suggested Monday that he still has doubts.

"My concern is that this bill, in its present form, will create more problems than it solves, and it would be a mistake to bring it up without agreeing to an inclusive process for considering relevant amendments," he said.

Wyden added that the deal "does not fix the provision of this bill that allow private companies to hand large volumes of their customers' personal information over to the government with only a cursory review."

This story was updated at 6:46 p.m.