McConnell tees up vote on cybersecurity bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers feel pressure on guns Bipartisan group of House lawmakers urge action on Export-Import Bank nominees Curbelo Dem rival lashes out over immigration failure MORE (R-Ky.) is teeing up a cybersecurity bill, paving the way for a first vote on Wednesday.

The Republican leader filed cloture on the motion to proceed to the long-stalled Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

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The move comes after a preliminary deal on amendments was reached. The move, if successful, could help get the bill passed before senators leave for a five-week break.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Finance: Senate rejects Trump immigration plan | U.S. Bancorp to pay 0M in fines for lacking money laundering protections | Cryptocurrency market overcharges users | Prudential fights to loosen oversight Senators introduce bill to help businesses with trade complaints Our intelligence chiefs just want to tell the truth about national security MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinLawmakers feel pressure on guns Feinstein: Trump must urge GOP to pass bump stock ban Florida lawmakers reject motion to consider bill that would ban assault rifles MORE (D-Calif.), the top two lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Friday circulated a managers’ amendment that would address some of the privacy concerns that have slowed down the bill since March.

But Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees MORE (D-Ore.) suggested Monday that he still has doubts.

"My concern is that this bill, in its present form, will create more problems than it solves, and it would be a mistake to bring it up without agreeing to an inclusive process for considering relevant amendments," he said.

Wyden added that the deal "does not fix the provision of this bill that allow private companies to hand large volumes of their customers' personal information over to the government with only a cursory review."

This story was updated at 6:46 p.m.