McConnell tees up vote on cybersecurity bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSen. Warner to introduce amendment limiting Trump’s ability to revoke security clearances The Hill's 12:30 Report Rand Paul to ask Trump to lift sanctions on Russian leaders MORE (R-Ky.) is teeing up a cybersecurity bill, paving the way for a first vote on Wednesday.

The Republican leader filed cloture on the motion to proceed to the long-stalled Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

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The move comes after a preliminary deal on amendments was reached. The move, if successful, could help get the bill passed before senators leave for a five-week break.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrWhite House weighs clawing back State, foreign aid funding Conway blasts Brennan: 'Why is he screaming' about losing his clearance 'on a lower-rated cable network?' The Hill's Morning Report: Dems have a majority in the Senate (this week) MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats question if Kavanaugh lied about work on terrorism policy Dems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints Progressives fume as Dems meet with Brett Kavanaugh MORE (D-Calif.), the top two lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Friday circulated a managers’ amendment that would address some of the privacy concerns that have slowed down the bill since March.

But Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenGroup files lawsuit to force Georgia to adopt paper ballots Treasury releases proposed rules on major part of Trump tax law Rubio slams Google over plans to unveil censored Chinese search engine MORE (D-Ore.) suggested Monday that he still has doubts.

"My concern is that this bill, in its present form, will create more problems than it solves, and it would be a mistake to bring it up without agreeing to an inclusive process for considering relevant amendments," he said.

Wyden added that the deal "does not fix the provision of this bill that allow private companies to hand large volumes of their customers' personal information over to the government with only a cursory review."

This story was updated at 6:46 p.m.