McConnell tees up vote on cybersecurity bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules Duckworth brings her baby to Senate vote, drawing a crowd FreedomWorks backs Jim Jordan for House Speaker MORE (R-Ky.) is teeing up a cybersecurity bill, paving the way for a first vote on Wednesday.

The Republican leader filed cloture on the motion to proceed to the long-stalled Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

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The move comes after a preliminary deal on amendments was reached. The move, if successful, could help get the bill passed before senators leave for a five-week break.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenators express concerns over Haspel's 'destruction of evidence' Overnight Cybersecurity: US, UK blame Russia for global cyberattacks | Top cyber official leaving White House | Zuckerberg to meet EU digital chief Senators, state officials to meet on election cybersecurity bill MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSenate panel punts Mueller protection bill to next week Steyer endorses de León in bid to unseat Feinstein Amid struggle for votes, GOP plows ahead with Cabinet picks MORE (D-Calif.), the top two lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Friday circulated a managers’ amendment that would address some of the privacy concerns that have slowed down the bill since March.

But Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators want info on 'stingray' surveillance in DC | Bills to secure energy infrastructure advance | GOP lawmaker offers cyber deterrence bill Overnight Tech: Alleged robocall kingpin testifies before Congress | What lawmakers learned | Push for new robocall rules | Facebook changes privacy settings ahead of new data law | Time Warner CEO defends AT&T merger at trial Dems give muted praise to Pompeo-Kim meeting MORE (D-Ore.) suggested Monday that he still has doubts.

"My concern is that this bill, in its present form, will create more problems than it solves, and it would be a mistake to bring it up without agreeing to an inclusive process for considering relevant amendments," he said.

Wyden added that the deal "does not fix the provision of this bill that allow private companies to hand large volumes of their customers' personal information over to the government with only a cursory review."

This story was updated at 6:46 p.m.