Sanders wants panel to study privacy in digital age
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden raises possibility of 2020 presidential bid Cures bill clears first Senate hurdle A record number of Indian Americans have been elected to Congress MORE (I-Vt.) is renewing his effort to create a panel to investigate the impact of technology on privacy as part of the Senate's cyber bill.  

Sanders, who is running for the Democratic presidential nomination, is offering an amendment to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) that would establish "a Commission on Privacy Rights in the Digital Age." 
 
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He wants the group to look into how public and private companies gather data on U.S. citizens and how that data is used and recommend any changes "needed to safeguard the privacy of the people of the United States," according to the amendment. 
 
He also wants the panel, which would have subpoena power, to home in on any implications for privacy rights, transparency for the government and consumers and potential waste, fraud or abuse. 
 
The panel would include 13 members — five that are appointed the president, two each from the Senate's majority leader and minority leader and two each from the speaker of the House and the minority leader. 
 
The amendment isn't the first time Sanders has tried to create a body to look into the how modern technology is impacting privacy. He offered a similar amendment to an annual defense policy bill, the National Defense Authorization Act, earlier this year. 
 
Sanders, in his amendment to the cyber bill, argues that the panel is necessary, because "today, technology that did not exist 30 years ago pervades every aspect of life in the United States … [and] federal policies on privacy protection have not kept pace with the rapid expansion of technology." 
 
Earlier this year, Sanders voted against the USA Freedom Act, which reformed the National Security Agency's collection of bulk phone metadata, because he believed it didn't go far enough to safeguard Americans' privacy. 
 
“Technology has significantly outpaced public policy," he said earlier this year. "There is a huge amount of information being collected on our individual lives ranging from where we go to the books we buy and the magazines we read. We need to have a discussion about that.”