Some Republicans opposed the resolution because they wanted to fund the government for longer than six months. The only Democrat to oppose the resolution, Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Trump caves under immense pressure — what now? Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Manchin up 9 points over GOP challenger in W.Va. Senate race MORE (W.Va.), said he didn’t want to keep kicking the can down the road.

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“These continuing resolutions are suppose to be temporary, but it looks like they’ve become a permanent way of doing business,” Manchin said on the floor Thursday. “And it’s a bad way of doing business.”

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Republicans agree — it’s only a matter of time for Scott Pruitt Skyrocketing insulin prices provoke new outrage MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday that she’d vote against the resolution because she would prefer to see the appropriations bill get votes, rather than the spending resolution.

“Rather than consider these appropriations bills, they’d rather kick the can down the road and pass a six-month extension,” Collins said. “It’s still not too late; there’s no reason why the individual spending bills couldn’t be brought to the floor and allow senators to offer amendments.”

The resolution puts the government on pace to spend $1.047 trillion in discretionary spending in 2013, the same level agreed to in last year's Budget Control Act.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP senators call for probe of federal grants on climate change Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Key ObamaCare groups in limbo | Opioids sending thousands of kids into foster care | House passes bill allowing Medicaid to pay for opioid treatments US watchdog: 'We failed' to stem Afghan opium production MORE (R-Ky.) is filibustering the Senate, which requires that the maximum amount of time be spent on each vote, holding up legislation such as the spending resolution, until he gets a vote on his own bill.

Paul wants a Senate vote on his bill to end all foreign aid to Pakistan, Libya and Egypt. On Wednesday night, Reid announced that he and Paul came to an agreement to have a vote on Paul’s bill if he stopped holding up the continuing spending resolution, but Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMulvaney aims to cement CFPB legacy by ensuring successor's confirmation Trump mocks McCain at Nevada rally Don’t disrespect McCain by torpedoing his clean National Defense Authorization Act MORE (R-Ariz.) then objected to the idea because he disapproves of Paul’s bill.

Reid said he’s still hopeful that an agreement can be reached so that the Senate can finish up its business Thursday evening and adjourn until after the elections. If not, weekend votes would be required.