The Senate approved the six-month spending resolution to keep the government funded early Saturday morning.

The vote was 62-30, with 10 Republicans voting with the Democratic majority and only one Democrat, Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinPence pushes Manchin in home state to support Gorsuch Under pressure, Dems hold back Gorsuch support The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee MORE (W.V.), voting against. The vote took place after the upper chamber came to an agreement on other votes, including Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulTrump, GOP fumble chance to govern GOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill Rand Paul takes victory lap on GOP health bill MORE’s (R-Ky.) bill to end foreign aid to Egypt, Libya, Pakistan and Yemen unless they met certain conditions.

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The continuing resoluion will now go to the White House where the president is expected to sign it into law. The fundng of the government must be authorized before the new fiscal year begins on October 1.

Paul had been filibustering the Senate for days, delaying action by requiring the maximum amount of time be spent on each vote until he got a vote on his own bill, which failed, 10-81.

Numerous Republican senators stood up in opposition to Paul’s bill, calling it dangerous and irresponsible, especially to Israel. But Paul said he believed the American people were on his side.

“They don’t want to vote for this because they know they’re voting against the will of their constituents,” Paul said Friday on the floor.
 
Republican Sens. Mike CrapoMike CrapoSenators war over Wall Street during hearing for Trump's SEC pick Overnight Finance: Biz groups endorse Trump's Labor pick | New CBO score coming before health bill vote | Lawmakers push back on public broadcasting cuts Senate Banking panel seeks proposals for economic growth MORE (Idaho), Jim DeMint (S.C.), Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill Friends, foes spar in fight on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing MORE (Iowa), Mike LeeMike LeeLawmakers signal fight for healthcare reform is not over Lee: Healthcare 'absolutely not' behind us GOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (Utah), Jerry MoranJerry MoranGOP lawmakers lead way in holding town halls Yahoo reveals new details about security A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (Kan.) Paul, James Risch (Idaho), Pat RobertsPat RobertsDems mock House GOP over lack of women in healthcare meeting Perdue vows to be chief salesman for US agriculture abroad GOP senator apologizes for mammogram joke MORE (Kan.), Richard Shelby (Ala.) and Pat Toomey (Pa.) voted for Paul's measure.

“Americans are crying out for us to stop giving out tax dollars to those who aren’t our friends,” DeMint said, after mentioning that Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MORE (D-Nev.) wouldn’t allow an amendment to Paul’s bill to loosen the language, which DeMint preferred and Paul agreed to.

There was a fair amount of opposition to the continuing resolution, — H.J.Res. 117 — which funds the government through March. The resolution that passed in the House last week puts the government on pace to spend $1.047 trillion in discretionary spending in 2013, the same level agreed to in last year's Budget Control Act.

Some Republicans opposed the resolution because they wanted to fund the government for longer than six months. Manchin, the sole Democrat in opposition, said he didn’t want to keep kicking the can down the road.

“These continuing resolutions are suppose to be temporary, but it looks like they’ve become a permanent way of doing business,” Manchin said on the floor Thursday. “And it’s a bad way of doing business.”

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsGOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill Five takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday that she’d vote against the resolution because she would prefer to see the appropriations bill get votes, rather than the spending resolution.

“Rather than consider these appropriations bills, they’d rather kick the can down the road and pass a six-month extension,” Collins said. “It’s still not too late; there’s no reason why the individual spending bills couldn’t be brought to the floor and allow senators to offer amendments.”

The Senate also voted on S.J. Res. 41, which says the United States and other countries have a vital interest in working together to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons capability. Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamGraham: 'I'm glad' Ivanka will be working in the White House Trump tweets promotion for Fox News show GOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-S.C.) introduced the resolution that had 82 cosponsors. It was approved on a 90-1 vote.

“We know with certainty that Iranian leaders show no signs of wanting to halt their program to develop nuclear weapons,” a co-sponsor, Sen. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalSenators introduce new Iran sanctions Senators demand Pentagon action after nude photo scandal Gorsuch rewrites playbook for confirmation hearings MORE (D-Conn.), said. “This resolution says to the world that the United States and governments of other responsible nations have a vital mutual interest to stop Iran from nuclear weapons capability.”

Paul voted against the resolution because he said it was “a vote for preemptive war” against Iran.

The vote on the CR concluded after 1 a.m. Saturday.

The final piece of business the Senate addressed before leaving for the November elections was a vote on a motion to proceed to the Sportsman Act when they return. The motion was approved by a 84-7 vote. 

Sen. Jon TesterJon TesterUnder pressure, Dems hold back Gorsuch support The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Overnight Defense: Pentagon chief urges Congress to approve budget boost | Senate fight over NATO addition MORE (D-Mont.) introduced S. 3525, which combines 20 bipartisan bills to increase access to federal land for hunters and fishers while also supporting conservation measures.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellThe Memo: Winners and losers from the battle over healthcare GOP senators pitch alternatives after House pulls ObamaCare repeal bill Under pressure, Dems hold back Gorsuch support MORE (R-Ky.), at the last minute tried to force a vote on the House sportsman package, H.R. 4089, but Reid objected, saying that the House version was much smaller and less comprehensive than Tester’s version.

“If this vote was about sportsmen the Senate would have taken up the House passed bill that can be signed into law today,” a senior GOP aid said Saturday morning. “But that’s not what Democrats picked. Democrats chose to scrap any chance that sportsmen can get a bill signed into law anytime soon in order to provide a cover vote for an endangered incumbent.”

Reid praised the bill for bipartisanship and said there was no reason Republicans should object to the measure, especially since it doesn’t cost anything.

“If you flip through the dictionary and found the definition of bipartisan some of it would be this Tester package,” Reid said on the floor Thursday.

Reid also said Friday that when the Senate returns it would take up a housing bill by Sen. Bob MenendezRobert MenendezCorruption trial could roil NJ Senate race Steve Mnuchin, foreclosure king, now runs your US Treasury Senate Dems move to nix Trump's deportation order MORE (D-N.J.).

This article was updated at 1:50 a.m.