The Senate on Thursday rejected a short-term spending bill that would defund Planned Parenthood, thwarting the opening move by Republican leaders to avoid a government shutdown on Oct. 1.

Senators voted 47-52 on ending debate on the short-term continuing resolution, well short of the 60 votes needed. The legislation would have funded the government through Dec. 11.

The vote divided Republicans, with eight of them breaking ranks. Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteAudit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars US sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years No, the US did not spend million on a gas station in Afghanistan MORE (N.H.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (Maine), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP looks for Plan B after failure of immigration measures Senate rejects Trump immigration plan Our intelligence chiefs just want to tell the truth about national security MORE (Ark.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThe siren of Baton Rouge Big Republican missteps needed for Democrats to win in November What to watch for in the Senate immigration votes MORE (Nev.) Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (Ill.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe siren of Baton Rouge Interior plan to use drilling funds for new projects met with skepticism The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem wins Kentucky state House seat in district Trump won by 49 points GOP's tax reform bait-and-switch will widen inequality Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived MORE (Ky.) and Ben Sasse (Neb.) all voted against moving forward.

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinPavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie Toomey to introduce bill broadening background checks for firearms Scott Walker backs West Virginia attorney general in GOP Senate primary MORE (W.Va.) was the only Democrat to vote in favor.

After the vote, Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers feel pressure on guns Bipartisan group of House lawmakers urge action on Export-Import Bank nominees Curbelo Dem rival lashes out over immigration failure MORE (R-Ky.) filed a new short-term spending bill that would fund the government and Planned Parenthood.

"I regret the Democratic leadership determined a crisis would be necessary to advance a policy aim of growing the government and that our colleagues decided accordingly to block every single funding bill," McConnell said. "We've been forced to pursue a continuing resolution as a result."

The majority leader could file cloture on the new funding bill in the afternoon. That could set the stage for a final vote early next week.

One senator who could drag out the process is Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day HHS official put on leave amid probe into social media posts Trump, Pence to address CPAC this week MORE.

The Texas Republican, who is running for president, has slammed Republican leadership during the funding fight, telling reporters that they “will support 100 percent of the priorities of Democrats.”

Cruz could try to force weekend work by objecting to a request to adjourn on Friday, but he could be rebuffed by a majority vote.

The presidential hopeful has reasons of his own to avoid weekend work, as he is currently scheduled to campaign in Iowa on Saturday.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchOvernight Finance: NAFTA defenders dig in | Tech pushes Treasury to fight EU on taxes | AT&T faces setback in merger trial | Dems make new case against Trump tax law | Trump fuels fight over gas tax What sort of senator will Mitt Romney be? Not a backbencher, even day one Lawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves MORE (R-Utah), questioned as to whether the Senate would work this weekend, said "no." Asked if he was sure, he replied, "yeah, I'm pretty sure."

The White House, meanwhile, reiterated its pledge to veto any spending bill that reaches President Obama's desk without funding for Planned Parenthood.

“By eliminating Federal funding for a major provider of health care, the Senate amendment to H.J.Res. 61 would limit access to health care for women, men, and families across the Nation, and disproportionately impact low-income individuals,” the Office of Management and Budget said in a statement.

Senate Democrats, and even some Republicans, slammed Thursday’s vote, suggesting it was a waste of time with less than a week left before government funding expires and federal workers are furloughed — something that last happened in 2013.

Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWATCH: There is no Trump-Russia collusion and the media should stop pushing this The demise of debate in Congress ‘North by Northwest,’ the Carter Page remake MORE (D-Nev.) said Thursday’s vote was the latest in a line of Republican “publicity stunts.”

“Instead of voting today on a bipartisan way forward, we’ll have another failed vote,” he said. “Republicans should abandon their commitment to fruitless votes and pass a clean funding bill.”

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, said Thursday's vote "should send the message loud and clear to the House of Representatives that Americans overwhelmingly support the care that Planned Parenthood provides."

The new funding bill is expected to have the votes to pass the Senate, though Cruz and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who is also running for president, have pledged to vote against it.

But it remains to be seen whether the spending bill can pass the House.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRestoring fiscal sanity requires bipartisan courage GOP congressman slams primary rival for Ryan donations Speculation swirls about Kevin McCarthy’s future MORE (R-Ohio) is under intense pressure from conservative lawmakers to stand firm on defunding Planned Parenthood.

More than 30 House conservatives have pledged to vote against any funding bill that includes Planned Parenthood, spurred by a series of controversial undercover videos dealing with the organization’s handling of fetal tissue.

With chatter of a potential coup against the Speaker growing, BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRestoring fiscal sanity requires bipartisan courage GOP congressman slams primary rival for Ryan donations Speculation swirls about Kevin McCarthy’s future MORE is treading carefully.

He has yet to say whether he will schedule a vote on a bill that does not defund Planned Parenthood, though a decision could be announced when House Republicans gather Friday morning for a conference meeting.

Boehner would likely need Democratic votes to pass such a bill, given the expected defections on the Republican side.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynLawmakers feel pressure on guns Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting Murphy: Trump’s support for background check bill shows gun politics ‘shifting rapidly’ MORE (R-Texas) predicted that the Senate would “quickly” send something to the House, where lawmakers will “have to figure out what they can do.”

"The House has got their own process right now, and I think they're kind of waiting to see what we do," added Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneFlake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March The 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework MORE (R-S.D.).

This story was updated at 3:46 p.m.