The Senate on Thursday rejected a short-term spending bill that would defund Planned Parenthood, thwarting the opening move by Republican leaders to avoid a government shutdown on Oct. 1.

Senators voted 47-52 on ending debate on the short-term continuing resolution, well short of the 60 votes needed. The legislation would have funded the government through Dec. 11.

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The vote divided Republicans, with eight of them breaking ranks. Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteFEC commissioner to Trump: Prove voter fraud Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Lewandowski saw no evidence of voter fraud in New Hampshire MORE (N.H.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsSenate braces for fallout over Supreme Court fight Overnight Finance: WH wants to slash billions | Border wall funding likely on hold | Wells Fargo to pay 0M over unauthorized accounts | Dems debate revamping consumer board Lawmakers call for pilot program to test for energy sector vulnerabilities MORE (Maine), Tom CottonTom CottonCotton: House 'moved a bit too fast' on healthcare Sunday shows preview: Aftermath of failed healthcare bill Senators introduce new Iran sanctions MORE (Ark.), Dean HellerDean HellerWith GOP’s healthcare bill on ice, Dems go on offense Red-state Dems in Supreme Court pressure cooker This week: House GOP faces make-or-break moment on ObamaCare MORE (Nev.) Mark KirkMark KirkObamaCare repeal bill would defund Planned Parenthood Leaked ObamaCare bill would defund Planned Parenthood GOP senator won't vote to defund Planned Parenthood MORE (Ill.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiElle honors 10 at annual 'Women in Washington' event Five takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRand PaulTrump: 'No doubt' we'll make a deal on healthcare Overnight Defense: General says US strike probably led to civilian deaths | Tillerson to push NATO on spending | Trump taps F-35 chief Senate backs Montenegro's NATO membership MORE (Ky.) and Ben Sasse (Neb.) all voted against moving forward.

Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSenate Dems to Trump: Work with us on ObamaCare GOP senator to Dems: 'What's all the whining about' on Supreme Court? Senate braces for fallout over Supreme Court fight MORE (W.Va.) was the only Democrat to vote in favor.

After the vote, Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellThe truth is the latest casualty of today’s brand of politics McCain and Graham: We won't back short-term government funding bill Senate seen as starting point for Trump’s infrastructure plan MORE (R-Ky.) filed a new short-term spending bill that would fund the government and Planned Parenthood.

"I regret the Democratic leadership determined a crisis would be necessary to advance a policy aim of growing the government and that our colleagues decided accordingly to block every single funding bill," McConnell said. "We've been forced to pursue a continuing resolution as a result."

The majority leader could file cloture on the new funding bill in the afternoon. That could set the stage for a final vote early next week.

One senator who could drag out the process is Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzTexas Dem targets Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018 What are 'religious liberty' bills really about? Fiorina calls for special prosecutor for Russia probe MORE.

The Texas Republican, who is running for president, has slammed Republican leadership during the funding fight, telling reporters that they “will support 100 percent of the priorities of Democrats.”

Cruz could try to force weekend work by objecting to a request to adjourn on Friday, but he could be rebuffed by a majority vote.

The presidential hopeful has reasons of his own to avoid weekend work, as he is currently scheduled to campaign in Iowa on Saturday.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchGOP senator to Dems: 'What's all the whining about' on Supreme Court? Trump, time to end outsourcing ... at the IRS Hatch: I may retire if Romney runs to replace me MORE (R-Utah), questioned as to whether the Senate would work this weekend, said "no." Asked if he was sure, he replied, "yeah, I'm pretty sure."

The White House, meanwhile, reiterated its pledge to veto any spending bill that reaches President Obama's desk without funding for Planned Parenthood.

“By eliminating Federal funding for a major provider of health care, the Senate amendment to H.J.Res. 61 would limit access to health care for women, men, and families across the Nation, and disproportionately impact low-income individuals,” the Office of Management and Budget said in a statement.

Senate Democrats, and even some Republicans, slammed Thursday’s vote, suggesting it was a waste of time with less than a week left before government funding expires and federal workers are furloughed — something that last happened in 2013.

Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidRepublican failure Senate about to enter 'nuclear option' death spiral Top GOP senator: 'Tragic mistake' if Democrats try to block Gorsuch MORE (D-Nev.) said Thursday’s vote was the latest in a line of Republican “publicity stunts.”

“Instead of voting today on a bipartisan way forward, we’ll have another failed vote,” he said. “Republicans should abandon their commitment to fruitless votes and pass a clean funding bill.”

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, said Thursday's vote "should send the message loud and clear to the House of Representatives that Americans overwhelmingly support the care that Planned Parenthood provides."

The new funding bill is expected to have the votes to pass the Senate, though Cruz and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who is also running for president, have pledged to vote against it.

But it remains to be seen whether the spending bill can pass the House.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerPaul Ryan sells out conservatives with healthcare surrender Matt Schlapp: 5 lessons Trump, Ryan must learn from healthcare debate Nunes rebuffs calls for recusal MORE (R-Ohio) is under intense pressure from conservative lawmakers to stand firm on defunding Planned Parenthood.

More than 30 House conservatives have pledged to vote against any funding bill that includes Planned Parenthood, spurred by a series of controversial undercover videos dealing with the organization’s handling of fetal tissue.

With chatter of a potential coup against the Speaker growing, BoehnerJohn BoehnerPaul Ryan sells out conservatives with healthcare surrender Matt Schlapp: 5 lessons Trump, Ryan must learn from healthcare debate Nunes rebuffs calls for recusal MORE is treading carefully.

He has yet to say whether he will schedule a vote on a bill that does not defund Planned Parenthood, though a decision could be announced when House Republicans gather Friday morning for a conference meeting.

Boehner would likely need Democratic votes to pass such a bill, given the expected defections on the Republican side.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynTexas Dem targets Sen. Ted Cruz in 2018 Senate Dems: Border wall is a budget 'poison pill' Senate braces for fallout over Supreme Court fight MORE (R-Texas) predicted that the Senate would “quickly” send something to the House, where lawmakers will “have to figure out what they can do.”

"The House has got their own process right now, and I think they're kind of waiting to see what we do," added Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneSenators move to bolster cyber resources for small businesses Optimism rising for infrastructure deal McConnell: ObamaCare 'status quo' will stay in place moving forward MORE (R-S.D.).

This story was updated at 3:46 p.m.