Paul slams Rubio's visa waiver vote, saying rival prefers 'open borders'
© Getty Images

Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulDems blast Trump plans for deep spending cuts Trump team prepares dramatic cuts Paul, Lee call on Trump to work with Congress on foreign policy MORE (R-Ky.) slammed Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioGOP, Dems hear different things from Trump Senate committee to vote Monday on Tillerson Tillerson met with top State official: report MORE Friday, suggesting that the Florida Republican's opposition to a proposal cracking down on visas is the latest example of where he's wrong on national security.

"The first job of the President should be to secure our borders and fix broken refugee and visa systems to stop terrorists," Paul, a GOP presidential candidate, said during a string of tweets aimed at the Florida Republican, also a 2016 candidate. "Yesterday I introduced my SECURE bill as an amendment in the Senate, to protect our borders and resources. Marco Rubio voted no."
 
ADVERTISEMENT
The Kentucky Republican tried to attach a proposal that would pause visas for almost 40 countries to the ObamaCare repeal bill passed by the Senate on Thursday evening. The proposal would also require individuals who are from Visa Waiver Program countries to wait 30 days before entering the country.
 
He ultimately fell short, with only 10 Republicans — including himself and another presidential candidate, Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzTrump's America: Businessmen in, bureaucrats out When Trump says 'Make America Great Again,' he means it Booker is taking orders from corporate pharmaceuticals MORE (R-Texas) — voting for the amendment, which would have also required additional screening for any admitted refugees. 
 
Even if the amendment had been added to the legislation, it stood little chance of becoming law with President Obama expected to veto the repeal legislation. 
 
Paul, however, suggested on Friday that Rubio's "no" vote was the latest example of where he believes the Florida Republican — dating back to his time in the state legislature — has been wrong on national security issues. 
 
"For years on this important national security test, I have led, and Marco Rubio has failed," he said in a separate tweet, adding, "As I led, Marco Rubio has gone the other way, preferring open borders, broken systems and siding with [Democratic Sens.] Harry ReidHarry ReidFranken emerges as liberal force in hearings GOP eyes new push to break up California court The DC bubble is strangling the DNC MORE and Chuck SchumerCharles SchumerDemocrats and the boycott of Trump's inauguration The Hill's 12:30 Report Why Democrats fear a successful inaugural address from Trump MORE."
 
The tweets aren't the first time the two senators have clashed on foreign policy issues, where Paul's libertarian views frequently put him at odds with Rubio's hawkish stances. 
 
The two have repeatedly traded barbs over a myriad of national security topics including government surveillance — where they were on opposite sides during a Senate debate earlier this year, how to confront Russian President Vladimir Putin and if a no-fly zone is needed in Syria. 
 
The Kentucky Republican stepped up the rhetorical battle earlier this week when he suggested that Rubio's foreign policy stances are similar to former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonClinton: Photos from women’s march ‘awe-inspiring’ Ex-Clinton aide: Spicer should have resigned rather than lie Zuckerberg moves spark 2020 speculation MORE, who is the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination. 
 
Contrasting himself with the "Clinton/Rubio foreign policy," Paul wrote in a Time magazine op-ed, "I hope voters will seek out a leader who will learn from history and not pursue a reckless policy."