Before the Senate adjourned for the November elections, Paul got a vote on his bill to cut off U.S. foreign aid to Egypt, Libya and Pakistan, but the measure failed on an 81-10 vote.

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Paul’s PAC is running similar ads this week in Missouri and Florida, where Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillKoch-backed group targets red-state Dems on tax reform Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Las Vegas highlights Islamist terrorism is not America's greatest domestic threat MORE (D-Mo.) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonSenate panel approves bill to speed up driverless cars Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump proclaims 'Cybersecurity Awareness Month' | Equifax missed chance to patch security flaw | Lawmakers await ex-CEO's testimony | SEC hack exposed personal data MORE (D-Fla.) are trying to keep their seats.

When Paul’s bill was being debated on the Senate floor, he repeatedly said the American people agreed with him that foreign aid shouldn’t be sent to countries that “don’t act like our friends” — a reason why his colleagues didn’t want to be on the record voting against his bill.

But 30 Republican senators voted with Democrats against Paul’s bill, some saying it would hurt relations with Israel and possibly jeopardize peace in the Middle East.

The Telegraph Forum said Justin Barasky, a spokesman for Brown's campaign, blasted the RANDPAC ads.

"This latest attack by one of the most extreme right-wing politicians in the country advocates a position that both John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts The VA's woes cannot be pinned on any singular administration Overnight Defense: Mattis offers support for Iran deal | McCain blocks nominees over Afghanistan strategy | Trump, Tillerson spilt raises new questions about N. Korea policy MORE and AIPAC (the American Israel Public Affairs Committee) disagree with in part because (it) jeopardizes aid to Israel," Barasky told the local paper.