The Senate voted overwhelmingly Friday in favor a $1.8 trillion package of spending bills and tax breaks, sending the legislation to President Obama’s desk for his signature. 

The 65-33 vote effectively wraps up the congressional session for the year, with the House and Senate adjourning for the holiday recess. 

ADVERTISEMENT
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCongress had a good couple of weeks — now let's keep it going McCarthy: 'The Mueller investigation has got to stop' McConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' MORE (R-Ky.) hailed the vote as a major accomplishment fulfilling his 2014 campaign pledge to get the Senate back on track if voters gave Republicans control.

“But we’re proving that you can still get a lot done with a President from a different party,” McConnell said on the floor. “We’re proving you can actually enact significant, long-term reforms, achieve conservative policy goals, and get them signed into law.”

Senate Democratic Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDonald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary McConnell cements his standing in GOP history MORE (Nev.) said his party deserves credit for working with Republicans after they repeatedly filibustered his agenda in the past several Congresses.

“This session of the Senate has been a demonstration of what can happen when a minority is not trying to block everything,” he said.

The Senate’s presidential candidates split on the legislation.

Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzUS-China trade war is just the start of the struggle for global order Dem lawmaker: Migrant family separation policy 'is on all of us' Cruz wins charity basketball challenge against Jimmy Kimmel MORE (R-Texas), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul's neighbor sentenced to 30 days in prison over assault Dems best GOP as Scalise returns for annual charity baseball game The Hill's Morning Report — Can the economy help Republicans buck political history in 2018? MORE (R-Ky.) and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) Sanders If Congress takes no action, the Social Security trust fund will become depleted in 2034 Ex-campaign manager: Sanders is still eying another presidential bid DNC chair backing plan to cut superdelegates opposed by Dem lawmakers MORE (I-Vt.) voted no, while Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP senator: Family separation policy 'inconsistent' with American values Trump’s trusted diplomat faces daunting task with North Korea Trump’s danger on North Korea? Raised expectations MORE (R-S.C.) voted yes. Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate rejects effort to boost Congress's national security oversight The Memo: Summit gives Trump political boost — with risks The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump, Kim make history with summit MORE (R-Fla.) was the only presidential candidate to miss the vote.

The legislation increases defense and nondefense spending above the caps set by the 2011 Budget Control Act, reflecting a budget deal reached by Obama and congressional leaders earlier this year.

It places a two-year moratorium on two key pieces of ObamaCare: the "Cadillac tax" on expensive health plans and the medical device tax. It also freezes the premium tax on health insurers for one year.

In total, it reduces revenue for the landmark healthcare reform law by $35 billion.

The administration opposed postponing the Cadillac tax, which not only funds ObamaCare but is supposed to serve as an important incentive for curbing healthcare costs, but won several policy victories in exchange.

The bill will make permanent three core elements of Obama’s 2009 fiscal stimulus: expansions of the Child Tax Credit, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the American Opportunity Tax Credit for college tuition.

Republicans secured several permanent tax breaks for the business community, with the research and development tax credit and the Section 179 small-business expensing deduction among the biggest wins.

In other big concession to the GOP, the legislation lifts the decades-old ban on oil exports, which could boost domestic oil production by as much as 500,000 barrels a day.

In return, Democrats gained five-year extensions of wind and solar tax breaks. The legislation extends the 30-percent solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC) and the credit for solar-powered energy-efficient properties for three years, phasing it down in the final two. 

It extends the wind protection tax credit for two years before a three-year phase-down, ending in 2022.    

The House voted overwhelmingly to pass the $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill and the $622 billion tax package separately in action earlier Friday. The cost of the tax legislation is not offset and will add to the deficit.

The two bills were merged into one and delivered to the upper chamber as a message from the House.  

Republican presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpEx-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies Laura Bush blasts Trump migrant policy as 'cruel' and 'immoral' US denies report of coalition airstrike on Syria MORE slammed GOP congressional leaders for busting the 2011 spending caps with the omnibus and pairing it with a massive unpaid-for package of tax breaks.

“In order to avoid a government shutdown, a cowardly threat from an incompetent president, the elected Republicans in Congress threw in the towel and showed absolutely no budget discipline,” he said in a statement. “The American people will have to absorb higher deficits, greater debt, less economic liberty and more corporate welfare.”

The vote caps weeks of intense negotiations that took place between the leaders of both chambers and the appropriations and tax-writing committees.

Democrats beat back waves of Republican riders that would have rolled back parts of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, limited the ability of the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate carbon emissions, and removed the limit on coordination between political parties and candidates.

The legislation, however, does include two riders blocking the administration from moving ahead with two key campaign finance regulations. It stops the Securities and Exchange Commission from requiring corporations to disclose their political giving and the IRS from issuing new rules governing the activity of 501(c)4 social welfare advocacy groups.

- This story was first post at 10:54 a.m. and has been updated.