Senate sets up vote in January on Rand Paul's 'Audit the Fed' bill
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Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) — who said he was acting on behalf of Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDoug Jones walks tightrope on Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh gets questionnaires for confirmation hearing Dem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick MORE (R-Ky.) — set up a procedural vote on Paul's legislation for Tuesday, Jan. 12, the same day as President Obama's final State of the Union address. 

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"The Fed operating under a cloak of secrecy has gone on for far too long," Paul said in a statement after Republicans set up the vote. "The American people have a right to know exactly how Washington is spending their money. The time to act is now."
The proposal would increase congressional oversight of the Federal Reserve, as well as subject the central bank to an audit by the Government Accountability Office.  
 
The Senate originally fast-tracked the legislation to the Senate calendar, teeing it up for potential floor action earlier this month, with Paul's office pledging that it would come up for a vote soon.
 
Paul will need the support of 60 senators to overcome an initial procedural hurdle once the Senate returns. So far, 24 Republican senators — including presidential contenders Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Memo: Trump leaves chaos in his wake in UK Beto O'Rourke is dominating Ted Cruz in enthusiasm and fundraising — but he's still headed for defeat GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (R- Texas) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioScottish beer company offering ‘tiny cans’ for Trump’s ‘tiny hands’ The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies for Putin summit: 'He’s not my enemy’ Overnight Defense: Fallout from tense NATO summit | Senators push to block ZTE deal in defense bill | Blackwater founder makes new pitch for mercenaries to run Afghan war MORE (R-Fla.) — have officially signed on to the bill. 
 
Paul introduced similar legislation earlier this year, but that stalled in the Senate Banking Committee where Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), who chairs the committee, voiced opposition