Republican warns of White House influence on Clinton investigation
© Getty

The second-ranking Republican in the Senate is amplifying his call for the Justice Department to name a special counsel to investigate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE's email server, suggesting the White House is trying to influence the FBI's probe. 

 
ADVERTISEMENT
Cornyn said Attorney General Loretta Lynch should name a special counsel to counter the "apparent inability of the White House to resist the temptation to try to influence or at worst obstruct the current investigation." 
 
Cornyn pointed to remarks made last year by President Obama and separate comments from White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest last month, which he argued underscores that the administration is trying to sway the FBI's investigation.  
 
Asked if he could guarantee that Clinton wouldn't be indicted, Earnest told reporters that while that was a DOJ decision, some officials "have said is that she is not a target of the investigation. So that does not seem to be the direction that it's trending."
 
Cornyn said the comments suggested that either White House officials had "information they should not have... or they are sending a signal to the FBI and the Department of Justice that they want this to go away."
 
The FBI has been conducting a months-long investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of State over concerns about the mishandling of classified information. 
 
Cornyn said that while the FBI is "widely respected," it rests with the Justice Department to decide whether or not to indict Clinton.
 
The Texas Republican previously called for Lynch to name a special council last year, suggesting that the move would help ensure that "justice alone is being served."
 
The intelligence community’s internal watchdog, Inspector General I. Charles McCullough III, found last month that emails on Clinton's server were marked as "special access programs" — a classification above "top-secret."
 
After the report, Clinton quickly stood by her statement that she never "sent or received any material marked classified."