Rubio backs bill to curb drug abuse
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Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: Kaepernick deserves to be in the NFL Congress — when considering women’s health, don’t forget about lung cancer Anti-Maduro Venezuelans not unlike anti-Castro Cubans of yore MORE is signing on to a bill to combat drug abuse as he competes in the presidential primary in New Hampshire, which has one of the nation's worst rates of opioid abuse.  

 
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"It’s important to ensure that proper treatment services are there for those who are seeking help or who have fallen through the cracks, and this bill will help them get the care they deserve," Rubio said. 
 
Rubio's support for the legislation comes as the issue has gained prominence in the 2016 presidential election particularly in New Hampshire, which has its primary on Tuesday. The Florida senator took third place in the Iowa caucuses and has been hoping for at least a second-place showing in the early-voting state.
  
The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to mark up the Portman-Whitehouse bill Thursday.
 
Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenators near deal on sexual harassment policy change Blankenship third-party bid worries Senate GOP Overnight Finance: Trump signs repeal of auto-loan policy | Justices uphold contracts that bar employee class-action suits | US, China trade war 'on hold' MORE (R-Ky.) suggested late last month that the Senate would try to pass legislation this year and that lawmakers were "anxious" to see what gets passed out of the committee. The Obama administration is also seeking $1 billion to fight the epidemic.
 
Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenators near deal on sexual harassment policy change Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Five Republican run-offs to watch in Texas MORE, who is competing with Rubio for the GOP nomination, has not formally signed on to the Portman-Whitehouse legislation. The Texas Republican, however, has repeatedly discussed his half-sister's struggle with drug addiction and eventual death during the campaign, including at a forum last week in New Hampshire.