McConnell will not meet with Obama's nominee
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellThe Trump Administration has definitely not drained the swamp How does placing sanctions on Russia help America? Juan Williams: Senate GOP begins to push Trump away MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday said he won't even meet with President Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court.

McConnell said Republican members of the Judiciary Committee unanimously recommended to him that there should not be confirmation hearings this year to fill the vacancy created by Justice Antonin Scalia's death.

In light of that, McConnell said, a meeting with Obama’s nominee is unnecessary.

“I don’t know the purpose of such a visit [by the nominee.] I would not be inclined to take one myself,” he said.

Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynRepublicans play clean up on Trump's foreign policy Comey meets Intel senators amid uproar over Trump-Russia ties Corker: Senate GOP discussing best path for Russia probe MORE (R-Texas) echoed that position.

“I don’t see the point of going through the motions and creating a misleading impression that something else is going on,” Cornyn said.

McConnell said the rest of the Senate Republican Conference backed him in a lunchtime meeting Tuesday. 

"The overwhelming view of the Republican conference in the Senate is this vacancy should not be filled by this lame-duck president," he told reporters.

McConnell dug in his heels at an afternoon press conference as reporters peppered him with questions about his decision.

“I have many faults, but getting off message is not one of them. This nomination will be determined by whoever wins the presidency in the fall. I agree with the Judiciary Committee’s recommendation that we not have hearings,” he said.

“In short, there will not be action taken.”

Minutes before the GOP press conference, Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerOvernight Cybersecurity: Trump defends Flynn, blasts leaks | Yahoo fears further breach Overnight Finance: Trump's Labor pick withdraws | Ryan tries to save tax plan | Trump pushes tax reform with retailers Democrats declare victory after Puzder bows out MORE (D-N.Y.) stood by his party's assertion that Republicans would face “tremendous pressure” from Democrats and from the public to consider a nominee. 

“The bottom line is, I think there’s going to be enough pressure on the Republicans and do their job and have hearings and a vote,” Schumer, the chamber’s second-highest-ranking Democrat, said as he headed to the briefing. 

Updated at 3:45 p.m.