Senators are digging in for a long fight over President Obama's Supreme Court nominee.  

Lawmakers in both parties spent hours on the Senate floor Wednesday blasting the other party's rhetoric as Republicans remained united behind blocking Obama's eventual nominee. 
 
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Democrats boiled down their argument to three words, repeatedly telling Republicans to "do your job" by agreeing to take up President Obama's pick to succeed Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. 
 
Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill MORE (D-Ill.) called the GOP strategy of keeping the seat vacant until next year "dangerous" and "unprecedented" and warned that Democrats wouldn't drop the issue going into the November election. 
  
 
"If the majority leader sincerely believes that the only way to ensure the voice of the American people is heard is to lop off a last year of an elected official's term, I trust he will make these changes [to Congress]," he said. 
  
But Republicans hit back that Democrats are trying to cut voters out of the process by pushing through a third Supreme Court nominee for Obama during his final year. 
 
Sen. John CornynJohn CornynNew GOP ObamaCare repeal bill gains momentum Week ahead: Senators near deal to stabilize ObamaCare markets GOP eying 'blue slip' break to help Trump fill the courts MORE (R-Texas) said that the battle over who replaces Scalia goes beyond who is the next president but "will likely be about who will serve the next 30 years on the Supreme Court."
 
Republicans add that Democrats are being hypocritical and pointed to previous statements made by Vice President Biden, Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Memo: Trump pulls off a stone-cold stunner The Memo: Ending DACA a risky move for Trump Manchin pressed from both sides in reelection fight MORE (D-Nev.) and Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill This week: Senate wrapping up defense bill after amendment fight Cuomo warns Dems against cutting DACA deal with Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) on confirming justices near the end of a Republican president's term as ammunition in their rhetorical battle. 
 
Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (R-Utah) said that it as important to have "mutual respect" and a "deference to the facts" in the Supreme Court debate, before adding that he wants to "correct a few of the most pernicious errors and inaccuracies, facilities and fabrications" that he believes have been made by Democrats. 
 
Democrats, in turn, referenced previous statements made by Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate passes 0B defense bill Overnight Health Care: New GOP ObamaCare repeal bill gains momentum Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (R-Ky.) and Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley: 'Good chance' Senate panel will consider bills to protect Mueller Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea GOP state lawmakers meet to plan possible constitutional convention MORE (R-Iowa), the Judiciary Committee chairman. 
 
Reid took a direct shot at Grassley Wednesday, asking if the Iowa Republican wants to remembered as the "least productive" and "most obstructive Judiciary chairman in history."