The Senate voted to grant Russia permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status on Thursday.

On a 92-4 vote, the Senate approved the Russia trade bill with broad bipartisan support.

“We have to take very difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them,” Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusTop Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP tries to keep spotlight on taxes amid Mueller charges Clinton-Sanders tensions linger for Democrats MORE (D-Mont.) said before the vote. “PNTR is good for United States jobs ... and this is strong human rights legislation.”

ADVERTISEMENT
Rep. Dave Camp (R-Mich.) introduced the Russia and Moldova Jackson-Vanik Repeal and Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, H.R. 6156, which is necessary for U.S. businesses to benefit from lower tariffs after Russia joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) this summer.

The same bill passed in the House last month with broad support — it was approved on a 365-43 vote.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate GOP reveals different approach on tax reform GOP senators: Moore should step aside if allegations true Senate set for clash with House on tax bill MORE (R-Ohio), a former U.S. trade representative to the WTO, said he supported the measure because it would help generate new U.S. jobs in manufacturing and farming industries.

“We need to do all we can that we make sure our farmers and workers have access to the 95 percent of consumers that are outside of the U.S. borders,” Portman said on the floor Wednesday evening. “Without passing this legislation, our farmers and workers will get left behind.”

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinFacebook farce shows lawmaker deviousness, demagoguery Dem senator wants details on Manafort's multiple passports US backs out of global oil anti-corruption effort MORE (D-Md.) had hoped to include human rights language that would have imposed travel and financial sanctions on alleged human rights violators around the world, but the House-passed version included language that sanctions only violators in Russia.

Cardin said passing the bill would make sure the United States was “on the right side of history” and was a step forward in protecting human rights globally.

Sens. Carl LevinCarl LevinA lesson on abuse of power by Obama and his Senate allies President Trump, listen to candidate Trump and keep Volcker Rule Republicans can learn from John McCain’s heroism MORE (D-Mich.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Raymond ReedAfter Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem McCain pledges 'rigorous oversight' after Air Force failure to report Texas gunman's conviction Dems furious over Air Force failure to report Texas shooter's conviction MORE (D-R.I.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseTech companies grilled over Russian election interference Hitting GOP, Dems pitch raising 401(k) caps Democrats double down on calls for Congress to protect Mueller MORE (D-R.I.) and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersWorld leaders reach agreement on trade deal without United States: report Sanders on Brazile revelations: DNC needs ‘far more transparency’ Sen. Warren sold out the DNC MORE (I-Vt.) voted against the trade bill.

Levin said Wednesday that he would have preferred that the Senate vote on its version of the bill, which included the sanctions worldwide, rather than just affecting Russia.

“I don’t understand why we’re not taking up the Senate version and applying these standards universally,” Levin said on the Senate floor Wednesday night. “The only answer I can get is that the House might not pass the Senate version. Well, we should do what we think is right.”

The Magnitsky language — largely supported by Democrats — would require the administration to identify officials involved in Russian tax lawyer Sergei Magnitsk’s death, make those names public, and freeze the U.S. assets related to those officials. Magnitsky was investigating corruption and theft of the Russian government when he was jailed.

Senate Finance Committee ranking member Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchRead Senate GOP's tax bill Senate panel to start tax bill markup on Monday Senate set for clash with House on tax bill MORE (R-Utah) said that portion of the bill was “a powerful new tool to battle corruption” in Russia.

“If the [Obama] administration uses these tool effectively we will see ourselves in the future working side-by-side with a Russia free of corruption,” Hatch said.

The bill now goes to President Obama’s desk for his signature. The administration said it supports the measure.

Several senators said they wished the Obama administration would be firmer with Russia on sanitary restrictions — Russia has not allowed some U.S. produce and meat imports because of sanitary restrictions, despite having similar sanitary standards as the United States. The bill includes language that urges trade negotiators to continue to work on making sure there are not “unjustifiable” reasons for why U.S. agriculture products can’t be exported to Russia.