Reid: Dems could pull out of opioid bill
© Cameron Lancaster

Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump presses GOP to change Senate rules Only thing Defense’s UFO probe proves is power of political favors Nevada Democrat accused of sexual harassment reconsiders retirement: report MORE (D-Nev.) is warning that Democrats want more amendments to a bipartisan opioid bill or they may block it. 

"We should be able to offer amendments on this legislation. So I hope the Senate will be able to have a full and open amendment process," Reid said Thursday. "If not, we may not be able to proceed forward on this legislation. It would be too bad." 
While Democrats helped the legislation easily overcome a procedural hurdle earlier this week, they could still block Republicans from getting the 60 votes needed to end debate. 
Reid suggested Dems have not been allowed to offer enough amendments, adding that the Senate hasn't had a "robust amendment process."
"We would accept a new definition of robust I guess, if we got to offer a few amendments," he added. "We're not going to pass it if we get jammed." 
While no additional vote has been scheduled on the bill, Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCollins: 'Extremely disappointing' ObamaCare fix left out of spending deal House poised to vote on .3T spending bill Budowsky: Stop Trump from firing Mueller MORE (R-Ky.) said Thursday that senators "have an opportunity to take another step forward" on the legislation. 
Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley on Trump calling Putin: 'I wouldn't have a conversation with a criminal' Lawmakers zero in on Zuckerberg GOP senator blocking Trump's Intel nominee MORE (R-Iowa) added that he tried to schedule additional votes on the legislation but was blocked by Democrats, accusing them of setting up "additional roadblocks" and using "shenanigans" on the Senate floor. 
Reid's comments come after Republicans blocked a Democratic push to include $600 million in emergency funding in the legislation. Top Democrats, however, have suggested they will still support the opioid abuse bill without the extra money.  
The bill, from Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOvernight Tech: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica controversy | Senate passes sex trafficking bill | EU pushes new tax on tech | YouTube toughens rules on gun videos Senate passes controversial online sex trafficking bill GOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone MORE (R-Ohio) and Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Defense: Senate sides with Trump on military role in Yemen | Dem vets push for new war authorization on Iraq anniversary | General says time isn't 'right' for space corps Overnight Energy: EPA plans to restrict use of science data for regs | Pruitt's Italy trip cost more than K | Perry insists he's staying at Energy Senate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support MORE (D-R.I.), authorizes but doesn't appropriate funding for programs to combat prescription drug and heroin abuse, in addition to increasing the availability of naloxone, a drug to treat overdose.