Johnson: I would meet with SCOTUS nominee

Sen. Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonGOP rep doesn’t expect a literal border wall Trump should work with Congress to block regulations on prepaid cards Five reasons to worry about the ShadowBrokers hack MORE (R-Wis.) suggested Thursday he would be willing to meet with Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, though it won't change his position. 

"I have no problem with meeting with people," he told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. "I'll have to say, I'm not sure what the point will be."

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Johnson, considered one of the most vulnerable senators up for reelection, is the latest Republican to split with Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellLawmakers push one-week stopgap funding bill Overnight Finance: Inside Trump's tax plan | White House mulls order pulling out of NAFTA | New fight over Dodd-Frank begins Dem rep: Trump's tax plan as believable as 'magic, unicorns or Batman' MORE (R-Ky.) and say he would accept a meeting if the White House reaches out. 
 
So far, that hasn't happened. "No one has tried to set up a meeting," Johnson said. 
 
Johnson has said he believes the court seat should remain vacant until next year, though he would be willing to vote if Republican leadership decides to move forward with the nomination.
 
Republican Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteBottom Line How Gorsuch's confirmation shapes the next Supreme Court battle THE MEMO: Trump set to notch needed win with Gorsuch MORE (N.H.), Mark KirkMark KirkThe way forward on the Iran nuclear deal under President Trump ObamaCare repeal bill would defund Planned Parenthood Leaked ObamaCare bill would defund Planned Parenthood MORE (Ill.) and Rob PortmanRob PortmanOvernight Regulation: Senators call for 'cost-effective' regs | FCC chief unveils plans to roll back net neutrality Senators push 'cost-effective' reg reform Overnight Energy: Lawmakers work toward deal on miners’ benefits MORE (Ohio) — who are in reelection fights that, along with Johnson's, will help decide which party controls the Senate next year — have also said they would be willing to meet with Garland. 
 
Portman and Ayotte, however, suggested Wednesday they would use the meetings to explain why they think Justice Antonin Scalia's seat should remain vacant until the next president is sworn in. 
 
Republican senators, including Johnson, have been under an onslaught of pressure from Democrats and outside groups to reverse their position and support taking up Obama's nominee. 
 
Obama and Vice President Biden endorsed former Sen. Russ Feingold, who is hoping to unseat Johnson, earlier Thursday. 
 
Johnson isn't the only Republican senator who suggested Thursday they would be open to meeting with Garland.