Paul calls on Clinton to apologize for coal comments
© Getty Images

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Authorizing military force is necessary, but insufficient GOP feuds with outside group over analysis of tax framework MORE (R-Ky.) is calling on Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies DNC, RNC step up cyber protections Gun proposal picks up GOP support MORE to apologize for recent comments that she would put coal companies out of business.  

"I think she should apologize. She should apologize to every Kentucky worker that’s lost their job in recent times because of her policies," he said in a video, which was uploaded by Kentucky news site CN2. "I’m calling today for Hillary Clinton to apologize for all of Kentucky for these outrageous comments."
 
ADVERTISEMENT
Clinton sparked outrage from Republicans for comments she made during a CNN town hall Sunday while discussing her plan to create "clean renewable energy" jobs. 
 
"We're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business," she said at the time. "And we're going to make it clear that we don't want to forget those people." 
 
The comments also earned Clinton pushback from some Democrats who represent Appalachian communities who have been hit hard by the downturn in demand for coal. 
 
Paul added that her remarks were a "brazen comment" that showed "casual disregard for hardworking Kentucky coal miners — for them losing their jobs because of Hillary Clinton’s policies."
 

“Simply put, I was mistaken in my remarks,” she wrote in the letter, according to West Virginia MetroNews

In the letter, Clinton also said she supported legislation to help retired miners and their families and promised that her administration would focus on "bringing jobs to Appalachia, especially jobs producing the carbon capture technology we need for the future."

It isn't the first time Paul — who is running for reelection in Kentucky, which has seen a decline in coal-mining jobs — has targeted Clinton over her comments. 
 
His campaign released a video earlier this week featuring Clinton's coal comments and asking supporters to "stand with Rand against Hillary's war on coal." 
 
Clinton's campaign also quickly defended her comments as Republican criticism mounted in the wake of Sunday's debate. 
 
Brian Fallon, a spokesman for Clinton's campaign, suggested Republicans were "trying to twist" her words. 
 
"From fighting to protect retired miners' pensions to proposing new incentives to economically revitalize coal country, no candidate in this race is more devoted to supporting coal communities than Hillary Clinton. Any suggestions otherwise are false," he added.