Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryBringing the American election experience to Democratic Republic of the Congo Some Dems sizzle, others see their stock fall on road to 2020 The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Mass.) said the emergency-spending bill for Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts won’t pass unless money for fisheries is included.

“This legislation is not going to pass without the inclusion of this money, point blank,” Kerry said on the floor Wednesday.

The Senate started consideration this week of H.R. 1 as a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, but some conservatives have said the bill has unrelated and unnecessary spending measures, during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts.

The bill includes $150 million for fisheries in states that have disaster declarations, including Mississippi and Alaska — states not hit by Hurricane Sandy. In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast hard, affecting several states and their infrastructure.

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Kerry, along with Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenWeek ahead: Crunch time for defense bill’s cyber reforms | Equifax under scrutiny Five things to know about the Kaspersky-Russia controversy DHS bans Kaspersky software in federal agencies MORE (D-N.H.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseJuan Williams: Momentum builds against gerrymandering Overnight Regulation: FTC launches probe into Equifax | Dems propose tougher data security rules | NYC aims to slash greenhouse gas emissions | EPA to reconsider Obama coal ash rule Overnight Cybersecurity: Kaspersky to testify before House | US sanctions Iranians over cyberattacks | Equifax reveals flaw that led to hack MORE (D-R.I.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D-Alaska) and Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Bipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Dems press for paycheck fairness bill on Equal Pay Day MORE (D-Md.), said Sen. Tom CoburnTom Coburn-trillion debt puts US fiscal house on very shaky ground Al Franken: 'I make fun of the people who deserved it' The more complex the tax code, the more the wealthy benefit MORE (R-Okla.) has introduced an amendment to the bill that would jeopardize the funding for those fisheries that have been hit by bad weather and reduced stocks this year.

The Democratic senators said this $150 million wasn’t pork, but disaster relief that has been “thoroughly vetted.”

“I like earmarks, but this is not an earmark,” Begich said. “This takes nothing away from Superstorm Sandy … but this was also a disaster in a different making.”

Later Wednesday, Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsOvernight Cybersecurity: DHS bans agencies from using Kaspersky software | Panel calls Equifax CEO to testify | Facebook pulling ads from fake news Mueller investigation focusing on social media's role in 2016 election: report Intelligence director criticizes former officials for speaking out against Trump MORE (R-Ind.) offered an alternative emergency-funding bill that would not include money for fisheries. His version would cost roughly $24 billion.

The Coats bill does not contain money for storm damage, and eliminates funding for other past disasters. His office highlighted that it eliminates a grab-bag of random funding in the Democratic bill that has come under some scrutiny. The Democratic bill has money for fisheries in Alaska, to fix museum roofs in D.C., for wildfires in Colorado, for tree planting and for the Legal Services Corp., Coats’s office noted.

The Coats bill does not offset the emergency spending with cuts elsewhere. It remains to be seen if House Republicans will require offsets if they get to the Sandy bill at all in the lame-duck session, or what level they will seek to pass in funding.

The Senate is continuing amendment work on the measure. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Memo: Trump pulls off a stone-cold stunner The Memo: Ending DACA a risky move for Trump Manchin pressed from both sides in reelection fight MORE (D-Nev.) has said he wants to finish work on the bill this week, while House Republicans have said they want to take a longer look at the president's proposal to make sure there isn't any unnecessary spending.

--Erik Wasson contributed to this report.

--This report was originally published at 8:48 p.m. on Wednesday and last updated at 7:27 a.m. on Thursday.