Republican senator to meet with Obama SCOTUS nominee
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Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) said Wednesday he's agreed to meet with President Obama's Supreme Court pick, though he still thinks the seat should remain vacant until next year. 

"President Obama’s team has asked if I would meet with Judge Merrick Garland, and I have agreed to do so out of courtesy and respect for both the president and the judge," Toomey said in a statement.
 
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The Pennsylvania Republican added he still believes voters should help pick Justice Antonin Scalia's successor by selecting the next president, who would be able to fill the court seat. 
 
"I believe that is the best approach for deciding whether to alter the balance of the Supreme Court. I plan on making that clear to Judge Garland when I meet with him," he said. 
 
He has not said when he'll meet with Garland. The Senate is currently in the middle of a two-week recess.
 
Toomey is the latest in a small but growing number of Republicans who have said they, unlike Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock McConnell PAC demands Moore return its money Klobuchar taking over Franken's sexual assault bill MORE (R-Ky.), are willing to meet with Garland. 
 
Republican Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteExplaining Democratic victories: It’s gun violence, stupid Trump voter fraud panel member fights back against critics Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada MORE (N.H.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock Tax bills speed up global tax race to the bottom Someone besides the president should have the nuclear codes MORE (Wis.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP defends Trump judicial nominee with no trial experience Bipartisan compromise is vital to the legislative process Senate GOP reveals different approach on tax reform MORE (Ohio) have each suggested they are open to meeting with the president's pick, if only to explain why they think the Senate shouldn't take up his nomination. 
 
None of the three senators — who, like Toomey, face difficult paths to reelection — have suggested they believe the Senate should move forward with his nomination. 
 
Republican senators, including Toomey, have been under an onslaught of pressure from Democrats and outside groups to reverse their position. 
 
Of the handful of GOP incumbents likely to decide who will control the Senate next year, only Sen. Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) has split with his party and backed giving Garland a hearing and a vote.