In a 62-36 vote, the Senate on Monday approved legislation providing $50.7 billion to help New York, New Jersey and other states hit by Hurricane Sandy. 

All 36 "no" votes came from Republicans. GOP Sens. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderSenate panel rejects Trump funding cuts on Energy Department programs Governors-turned-senators meet to talk healthcare With healthcare bill derailed, GOP wonders: What now? MORE (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsThe GOP Wonder Women who saved healthcare for 22 million Senate heads to new healthcare vote with no clear plan OPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama MORE (Maine), Thad CochranThad CochranOvernight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda Senate committee ignores Trump, House budgets in favor of 2017 funding levels Overnight Finance: CBO finds 22M more uninsured under Senate health bill | GOP agrees ObamaCare taxes must go | Supreme Court to look at Dodd-Frank whistleblower protections | More tax reform hearings | Green light for partial travel ban | MORE (Miss.), Dean HellerDean HellerOvernight Healthcare: CBO predicts 22M would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement 40 million fewer people expected to vote in 2018, study finds The Memo: Trump tries to bend Congress to his will MORE (Nev.), John HoevenJohn HoevenMcCain absence adds to GOP agenda’s uncertainty McCain diagnosis looms over GOP healthcare talks This week: ObamaCare repeal faces latest setback in Senate MORE (N.D.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiThe GOP Wonder Women who saved healthcare for 22 million Senate heads to new healthcare vote with no clear plan OPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama MORE (Alaska), Richard Shelby (Ala.), David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE (La.) and Roger WickerRoger WickerTrump Navy secretary nominee moves forward to Senate vote 355-ship Navy not a must under Trump's secretary nominee GOP senator: 'Everybody wants to get to yes' on healthcare MORE (Miss.) voted "yes." 

The House had already approved the measure, so the Senate action sends the bill to President Obama, who has said he will sign it. 

The bill will reach Obama several weeks after supporters had hoped Congress would sign off on the measure. The House did not approve a similar measure in the last days of the previous Congress. 

“It was three months ago that Superstorm Sandy blew up the East Coast,” Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerOPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? Lawmakers send McCain well wishes after cancer diagnosis OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure MORE (D-N.Y.) said on the floor Monday evening before the vote. “Sandy’s wrath was wide and it was deep. Nearly 300,000 families had their homes damaged. ... We can’t wait any longer, because nothing about this was a game for those families.”

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 The House passed its bill earlier this month in a bipartisan 241-180 vote. 

Unlike a bill approved by the Senate in the last Congress late last year, the House measure did not include money for states outside the Northeast. 

Some Democratic senators complained on Monday that the bill they were approving was not as good as the previous measure. 

“This is not perfect, but it’s a very sound bill,” Senate Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Bipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Dems press for paycheck fairness bill on Equal Pay Day MORE (D-Md.) said. “The bill passed by Senate was by far a superior bill ... but let’s not make the perfect the enemy of the good.”

Republicans argued that separate weather-related disasters in the West should be dealt with separately and not lumped in with this bill. They also accused Democrats of adding “pork” to the bill last December.

“We have a habit of throwing money at things under an emergency category,” Sen. Dan CoatsDan CoatsOvernight Cybersecurity: White House says 'cyber unit' with Russia wouldn't share intel | Colorado moves to audit digital voting | Top State Department cyber official leaving | Dow Jones customer data exposed House moves to bar Pentagon contracts with firms backing North Korean cyberattacks How many Americans are swept up in the NSA's snooping programs? MORE (R-Ind.) said. “We simply can’t afford to keep doing this.”

Before final passage, the Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeCruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power Overnight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda The Memo: Trump tries to bend Congress to his will MORE (R-Utah) that would have offset the recovery spending by decreasing federal discretionary spending by 0.49 percent for nine years. 

“People have suffered as a result of this storm. My heart goes out to them,” Lee said. “[But] we must also consider how our actions here might have other implications down the road. We have to consider that we are more than $16 trillion in debt.”

Lee’s amendment was defeated 35-62. 

“We have already delayed this further than we should have because we’re arguing about offsets,” Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE (D-La.) said. “It has already been three months. ... We should not use disasters to push ideology, and that’s what the other side has been doing.”

Both chambers approved a $9.7 billion bill earlier this month for the National Flood Insurance Program to handle claims related to the storm, bringing the total recovery package to more than $60 billion — the amount the Obama administration originally requested.

The House bill included H.R. 219, which makes changes to disaster assistance intended to allow faster disbursement of disaster aid.