“Nationally, 1-in-4 women and 1-in-7 men experience severe physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner,” Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsFive takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing MORE (R-Maine) said on Monday ahead of the vote. “It is extremely important to pass this legislation because all men and women, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation and disability deserve to be safe and protected from physical violence. … This is not and never should be a partisan issue.”

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Republican Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzBudowsky: Trump’s war against truth Five takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing Republicans should seize the moment and repeal ObamaCare now MORE (Texas), Mike JohannsMike JohannsLobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops MORE (Neb.), Mike LeeMike LeeHealthcare fight pits Trump against Club for Growth Republicans should seize the moment and repeal ObamaCare now ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRand PaulHealthcare fight pits Trump against Club for Growth GOP rep: Trump could be 'one-term president' if healthcare bill passes Overnight Defense: Pentagon chief urges Congress to approve budget boost | Senate fight over NATO addition MORE (Ky.), James Risch (Idaho), Pat RobertsPat Roberts Where hunger is a weapon of war, food fights back Pressure mounts for changes to ObamaCare bill Trump's Agriculture pick should pop Big Organic's bubble MORE (Kan.), Marco RubioMarco RubioDem senator: House Intel chairman may have revealed classified info Five takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing GOP insists FBI probe won’t slow up Trump MORE (Fla.) and Tim ScottTim ScottA better economic policy Republicans rebuke King for racial remarks Conway on criticism: 'I'm not there to read about myself' MORE (S.C.) voted against the motion to proceed.

Both the House and Senate passed their own versions during the 112th Congress, but neither chamber took up the other's version. The Senate-version of VAWA extends protections for victims of domestic violence to Native Americans, LGBT victims and immigrants — this time without requiring more revenue and avoiding the "blue slip" problem. 

Democrats, including Obama, said they preferred the Senate bill because it would give tribal authorities jurisdiction over non-Indians in domestic violence cases, but that issue has raised questions about possible Constitutional violations. Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyLive coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Live coverage: Day two of Supreme Court nominee hearing Grassley, CNN host spar over Trump wiretap claims MORE (R-Iowa) said lawmakers would work during the next couple days to resolve the issue. If it's not resolved, Grassley said he would offer a substitute amendment that would remove that provision.

The Senate bill also prohibits discrimination against LGBT victims in grant programs to help victims, and would let illegal immigrants stay in the country to receive help if they are victims of domestic violence or rape.

“And we must guarantee communities have the resources to support victims — regardless of sexual orientation, immigration status or where they live — as they heal. Every victim of domestic violence deserves the same vigorous protections under the law,” Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MORE (D-Nev.) said on the Senate floor Monday ahead of the vote. “I hope the Senate’s bipartisan action this week will send a strong message to House Republican leaders that further partisan delay is unacceptable.”

VAWA provides grants to victims of domestic violence in order to encourage victims to leave their abusive situations. Some feel they can’t get away from their abusers because they might not have another form of family income, so the grants can provide housing assistance and cellphones for victims. Under this reauthorization bill, these programs would continue for another five years.

Reid said the bill has reduced cases of domestic violence by 53 percent since originally being passed two decades ago.

The Senate also added the SAFER Act to S. 47, which helps law enforcement agencies address nearly 300,000 rape kit backlogs waiting to be analyzed across the country.