“We continue to fight human trafficking, and human trafficking is nothing more than modern day slavery,” Leahy said Tuesday. “It is not just a policy matter it is a moral issue.”

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Republican Sens. Mike LeeMike LeeThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote McConnell allies confident in healthcare win GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them MORE (Utah), Jeff SessionsJeff SessionsRussia is recalling ambassador at center of Trump campaign controversy: report Justice Department developing strategies to shut down ‘sanctuary cities’: report Sally Yates slams Sessions on criminal justice reform MORE (Ala.), James InhofeJames InhofeMcCain strikes back as Trump’s chief critic Turbulence for Trump on air traffic control Parliamentarian threatens deadly blow to GOP healthcare bill MORE (Okla.), Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote McConnell allies confident in healthcare win GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them MORE (Wis.) and Tom CoburnTom Coburn'Path of least resistance' problematic for Congress Freedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC MORE (Okla.) were the only senators to vote against Leahy's amendment.

Sen. Rob PortmanRob PortmanMcConnell allies confident in healthcare win GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them Sanders: GOP healthcare bill is a 'moral outrage' MORE’s (R-Ohio) amendment would ensure that child victims of sex trafficking also have access to grants provided by VAWA, including educational services aimed to protect young victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. Sen. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalOnly Congress can enable drone technology to reach its full potential Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Dems urge Sessions to reject AT&T-Time Warner merger MORE (D-Conn.) co-sponsored that amendment, which passed on a 100-0 vote.

VAWA provides grants to victims of domestic violence in order to encourage victims to leave their abusive situations. Some feel they can’t get away from their abusers because they might not have another form of family income, so the grants can provide housing assistance and cellphones for victims. Under this reauthorization bill, S. 47, these programs would continue for another five years if the package receives enough votes for final passage, which is expected Tuesday afternoon.

The Senate is still considering three other amendments to the VAWA reauthorization bill. Descriptions of those follow:

— Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiThis week: Senate races toward ObamaCare repeal vote GOP senator defends funding Planned Parenthood GOP at decisive moment on Planned Parenthood MORE’s (R-Alaska) amendment is a technical correction that would clarify that in Alaska, Native American tribal jurisdiction would be for the Metlakatla tribe, which is the only tribe with land in Alaska despite other tribes residing in the state.

— Coburn’s amendment would consolidate duplicative programs within the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Coburn said his amendment would save at least $600 million that could be used to more quickly resolve rape cases by addressing the backlog of rape kit testing.

— Coburn’s amendment would encourage states to test convicted rapists for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) so that victims know if they need to seek treatment. If states refused to make such an adjustment to their laws, they would receive 20 percent less in VAWA grants. The amendment would also help provide the necessary treatment to the victims if they were at risk of infection.